Arts and Entertainment

Imagine's film about Vivian Maier, a French nanny who turned herself into a remarkable photographer, began with the tabloid headline reduction of her life: "Mary Poppins with a camera". If you already knew her story, I imagine that might have made you wince a little. If you didn't know her story, it was a mark of how good Jill Nicholls's film was that you winced in retrospect, when the Mary Poppins tag came round again. By then you understood how far short that simplification fell of Maier's captivating and thought-provoking tale, full of sad ironies and fruitful paradoxes.

Profile Clive Jones: An eye for the bigger picture

Carlton's chief believes in diversity of channels and viewers, writes Hilary Clarke

Review: First Call, Last Call

First Call

My Worst Car: Lesley Walters' Mini - Me and my Mini

I REMEMBER my worst car quite fondly. It was a bright orange Mini which cost pounds 200 and was held together with wire and clothes pegs. You might wonder how the pegs were used; well, that was to keep the choke out. It would not run without it. In all, I had six in a neat, colourful row.

Right of Reply: Martin George

British Airways' marketing director responds to Egon Ronay's criticisms of their food

Muriel sparks: In Glasgow, Tracey MacLeod is wary of being seduced by Nairns

'So this is how he keeps his prices down!' I crowed at Muriel, waving one of the child-size portions under her nose Photographs by Steve Messam

Family Affairs: Diary of a divorce

BELOVED AND BONK

Food & Drink: Essay - Food and the British

Michael Ratcliffe explores the nature of our passion

Sport on TV: Strangled gurgles and too much silver lining

Tom Watts, get out of town. There's a new voice on the blocks. Well, not so new. Seventy-one years old, in fact.

VANESSA THE CONFESSOR

THE EYE PROFILE : VANESSA FELTZ talks with James Rampton

'After three, groove on down to the booth'

The Referendum Party is planning to rock the vote with its single "Let the People Decide", sub-titled "The Rabble Army Song". It will be released in the run-up to the General Election in a bid to get youngsters boogying on down to the booths. Its creator was George Hargreaves, the man whose hit "So Macho" took Sinitta to number two in the charts in 1986.

Quiz reveals everything that you didn't want to know about Channel 5

Welcome to the age of the Mezzobrow.

FIRST, CATCH YOUR BANDWAGON

Publishing cookbooks used to be a genteel business, with erudite heroines such as Elizabeth David. No longer. Following Delia Smith's spectacula r successes last year, everyone wants a slice of the action. Emily Green watches the gold-rush

It's pop cuisine: the new way to a lad's heart

What has 35 TV shows a week, dozens of brash magazines and now a whole channel to itself? The answer is food. Vanessa Thorpe investigates

fringe round-up: Poems to Read to Your Parents

It was when the woman in the multi-coloured waistcoat started dancing to Neil Diamond's "Mr Bojangles", strummed with severe melancholy by a grey-haired man in white shorts, that the flashbacks started. Pebble Mill at One, mid-Seventies. That childhood incomprehension, barely articulated at the time, at so much desultory and unfulfilled adult behaviour. John Dowie (tracksuit bottoms, Larry Grayson specs "as skinny as a man can be") had prepared the way for this tot-recall with a series of short poems that sounded funny on the outside, but were, more often than not, sombre reflections on mortality (lines on dead cats and ageing men). "If you can't depress them when they're six, then what's the point of being in Edinburgh?" he inquired, to much parental approval.
Sport
Radamel Falcao
footballManchester United agree loan deal for Monaco striker Falcao
Voices
A man shoots at targets depicting a portrait of Russian President Vladimir Putin, in a shooting range in the center of the western Ukrainian city of Lviv
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Arts and Entertainment
The eyes have it: Kate Bush
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Louis van Gaal, Radamel Falcao, Arturo Vidal, Mats Hummels and Javier Hernandez
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Fifi Trixibelle Geldof with her mother, Paula Yates, in 1985
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Downton Abbey fans rejoice, series five returns later this month
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor