Have Western film-goers been racist?

As Slumdog Millionaire makes the jump from Bollywood to Hollywood, star ponders whether preferences have changed at last

Parties: Want to see my Bafta?

It's the Grey Goose Bafta after-party at the Grosvenor House Hotel, London, and the youth brigade have taken over. Brangelina and weeper Winslet are nowhere to be seen within the labyrinth of 15 rooms set aside for the bash – perhaps they're at one of impresario Harvey Weinstein's two parties across town.

Fresh top award for Slumdog Millionaire

The cast of Slumdog Millionaire added yet another piece of silverware to the film's bulging trophy cabinet last night, when they rounded off a hat-trick of British wins at the Screen Actors Guild awards in Los Angeles.

The Word On... Slumdog Millionaire

"It should be a huge hit; a romantic adventure set in India, made by English film-makers, featuring characters speaking Hindi, with a climax hinging on a question about a French novel. It's a blast." - Bob Mondello, www.npr.org

Film industry stunned by Bafta snub for Leigh

Acclaimed in America, but British awards ignore director and star of 'Happy Go Lucky'

Slumdog takes on Button for top Bafta honours

Slumdog Millionaire and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button each received 11 nominations for the Orange British Academy Film Awards today.

Slumdog Millionaire, Danny Boyle, 120 mins, 15

This 'rags to rajah' story is pacily told, but the poverty and violence sit uneasily with splashy entertainment

And the winner to be announced tomorrow is ...

Hollywood's awards season kicked off with an epic clanger as the Golden Globe website revealed a winner – 72 hours before the event. Guy Adams reports

Slumdog Millionaire wins big at Critics Choice Awards

"Slumdog Millionaire" was the final answer at the Critics Choice Awards last night, as the sweeping drama about an improbable winner of India's version of "Who Wants To Be a Millionaire" took the top prizes at the closely watched Oscar barometer.

Lives in gritty times provide apt theme for independent British film awards

The grim saga of the IRA hunger striker Bobby Sands and a feel-good rags to riches tale about a fictitious Indian slum kid swept the British Independent Film Awards last night.

First Night: Slumdog Millionaire, London Film Festival

Oliver Twisted as Boyle goes 'Trainspotting' in modern Mumbai express

Sands film in line for seven awards

Hunger, the debut film by artist Steve McQueen about IRA hunger striker Bobby Sands, has been nominated for seven British Independent Film Awards.

Bond ambition: Gemma Arteron swaps Thomas Hardy for Ian Fleming

Gemma Arterton graduated from St Trinian's to star as Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Now she's playing opposite Daniel Craig in the new Bond film. Is this the start of global domination for the girl from Gravesend?
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn