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Seven islands, seven landscapes: The Canary Island's busy network of

There are two essentials to island hopping, namely islands with enough contrast to warrant a hop, and an easy means of making such a hop. These days, it's easy to take in the multiple personalities of the Canary Islands in only a few short hops by hydrofoil and high-speed ferry.

Postcard from the edges: Stick to the coasts of the Canaries and

Charles Darwin was impressed: shortly after the great naturalist began his five-year voyage on which his theories evolved, he sailed past Tenerife in January 1832. "The first of many days never to be forgotten," he declared, even though he was banned from landing because of fears that HMS Beagle might bring cholera.

Time to make a splash? There are few places with as much to offer

Watersports are one of the great strengths of the Canary Islands. The north-easterly trade winds that once filled the sails of galleons from Portugal, France and Spain now propel windsurfers, tug at kites, and ruffle the hair of yachtsmen, sea kayakers and surf dudes. Scuba divers and snorkellers, too, have much to enjoy: this corner of the Atlantic is rich in marine life, including dolphins, turtles and a few species of (harmless) shark.

England game rained off

England's Twenty20 International against South Africa has been called off 24 hours in advance following heavy rain at the Chester-le-Street ground.

Antigua behind the brochures: gangsters' paradise?

The shooting of Catherine Mullany and her husband, Ben, has put the Caribbean island of Antigua under a harsh spotlight. As crime spikes and gangs proliferate, has its allure been tarnished beyond repair? Stephen Foley reports from St John's