Student

For us, the generation which in 2012 took that crucial, final step ahead towards higher education, the changes and challenges of the system came in waves. The first one, and perhaps the one with the biggest impact, was the rise in tuition fees.

Paperback: No One Belongs Here More Than You, By Miranda July

Miranda July has a disarming name that sits well with the artfully intense photo of her on the jacket. Normally these things aren't worth pointing out, but there's enough in this collection of whatever it is that makes her picture so distinctive that you might ponder it while considering a couple of things: Some of her writing has a tendency towards repetition, that seems to grasp at some sense of naivety. ("I still felt summery; I had a summery tableau in mind" or "Vincent was on the shared patio. I'll tell you about this patio. It is shared".) And in places her sexual frankness starts to resemble the unsolicited whisperings of a pervert on a bus. But skip a couple of the stories, squint a little here and there, and this becomes a very interesting collection.

A new electronic voting system in lectures is making a real difference

Andy Sharman looks at a gadget that pushes the right buttons

Leading Article: The union needs to pull together

Mergers of organisations are always difficult. Bringing together two staffs, two cultures and two ways of doing things will cause problems. The merger of the two lecturers' unions, the AUT and Natfhe, to form the University and College Union 18 months ago has been a tortuous process, made more problematic by the fact that lecturers at the "old" universities – the posh ones in membership of the Russell Group and the 94 group – have different traditions to lecturers at the "new" institutions. But this particular merger has also been bedevilled by personality clashes and by what some insiders regard as a lack of openness in decision-making.

Aisha Gill: Police are the key to ending the deaths

If the criminal justice system is to be seen as offering the most appropriate solution to violence against women, then we must question the value of the uniform treatment of cases. It is also essential that we confront the historical lack of action by the police along with their maltreatment of women when responding to "honour" crimes. Many women that I spoke to following the sentencing of Banaz's killers, for example, vowed never to use the criminal justice system to combat violence that they might experience. Of course, this is testimony from women who have not had a satisfactory experience and who do not wish to lose control of their lives in order to protect themselves. However, this does not exonerate the service of blame, as I have also met women who have wanted help from the criminal justice system, but who have failed to get the help they need.

Richard Downes: Large schools aren't such a bad thing

The size of schools has become a hot issue in recent weeks. The Conservatives have jumped on the bandwagon, and press comment appears to support the notion that big schools are bad for pupil behaviour and exam performance. The critics argue that few "titan schools" make it into the top 500 secondary schools in the league tables, and that discipline, behaviour and expulsion rates are worse than in smaller schools. I am chair of governors of a titan school – an adjective now sadly likely to become a pejorative description of failure within the education system – and I don't recognise my school at all in this analysis.

Against the Grain: 'Students need to feel valued and trusted'

Alan Mortiboys is Professor of Educational Development at Birmingham City University. He argues that university lecturers should teach with more emotional intelligence.

The Philanthropist, Donmar Warehouse, London

Academia painted as moral minefield in Molière rework

Leading article: Could do better

Focus: The Mo I knew: reckless, funny, a maker of enemies - but a world-class practical joker

Mo Mowlam was one of Britain's most popular public figures. But, says Andy McSmith, who knew her well, she was even more engaging in private

Bethan Marshall: A double whammy of stress and strain

The burden on these exams is bringing them to the point of near collapse
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A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

In the final part of our series, Chris Green arrives in Glasgow - a host city struggling to keep the politics out of its celebration of sport
Out in the cold: A writer spends a night on the streets and hears the stories of the homeless

A writer spends a night on the streets

Rough sleepers - the homeless, the destitute and the drunk - exist in every city. Will Nicoll meets those whose luck has run out
Striking new stations, high-speed links and (whisper it) better services - the UK's railways are entering a new golden age

UK's railways are entering a new golden age

New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

Alexander Fury salutes the Eurovision Song Contest winner's latest triumph
Pétanque World Championship in Marseilles hit by

Pétanque 'world cup' hit by death threats

This year's most acrimonious sporting event took place in France, not Brazil. How did pétanque get so passionate?
Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

Why did we stop eating whelks?

Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
10 best women's sunglasses

In the shade: 10 best women's sunglasses

From luxury bespoke eyewear to fun festival sunnies, we round up the shades to be seen in this summer
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

World Cup final: Messi? Mascherano is key for Argentina...

No 10 is always centre of attention but Barça team-mate is just as crucial to finalists’ hopes
Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

18-year-old says this month’s Commonwealth Games are a key staging post in her career before time slips away
The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

Can scientists save our sea life?

By the end of the century, the only living things left in our oceans could be plankton and jellyfish. Alex Renton meets the scientists who are trying to turn the tide
Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice