Student

For us, the generation which in 2012 took that crucial, final step ahead towards higher education, the changes and challenges of the system came in waves. The first one, and perhaps the one with the biggest impact, was the rise in tuition fees.

Paperback: No One Belongs Here More Than You, By Miranda July

Miranda July has a disarming name that sits well with the artfully intense photo of her on the jacket. Normally these things aren't worth pointing out, but there's enough in this collection of whatever it is that makes her picture so distinctive that you might ponder it while considering a couple of things: Some of her writing has a tendency towards repetition, that seems to grasp at some sense of naivety. ("I still felt summery; I had a summery tableau in mind" or "Vincent was on the shared patio. I'll tell you about this patio. It is shared".) And in places her sexual frankness starts to resemble the unsolicited whisperings of a pervert on a bus. But skip a couple of the stories, squint a little here and there, and this becomes a very interesting collection.

A new electronic voting system in lectures is making a real difference

Andy Sharman looks at a gadget that pushes the right buttons

Leading Article: The union needs to pull together

Mergers of organisations are always difficult. Bringing together two staffs, two cultures and two ways of doing things will cause problems. The merger of the two lecturers' unions, the AUT and Natfhe, to form the University and College Union 18 months ago has been a tortuous process, made more problematic by the fact that lecturers at the "old" universities – the posh ones in membership of the Russell Group and the 94 group – have different traditions to lecturers at the "new" institutions. But this particular merger has also been bedevilled by personality clashes and by what some insiders regard as a lack of openness in decision-making.

Aisha Gill: Police are the key to ending the deaths

If the criminal justice system is to be seen as offering the most appropriate solution to violence against women, then we must question the value of the uniform treatment of cases. It is also essential that we confront the historical lack of action by the police along with their maltreatment of women when responding to "honour" crimes. Many women that I spoke to following the sentencing of Banaz's killers, for example, vowed never to use the criminal justice system to combat violence that they might experience. Of course, this is testimony from women who have not had a satisfactory experience and who do not wish to lose control of their lives in order to protect themselves. However, this does not exonerate the service of blame, as I have also met women who have wanted help from the criminal justice system, but who have failed to get the help they need.

Richard Downes: Large schools aren't such a bad thing

The size of schools has become a hot issue in recent weeks. The Conservatives have jumped on the bandwagon, and press comment appears to support the notion that big schools are bad for pupil behaviour and exam performance. The critics argue that few "titan schools" make it into the top 500 secondary schools in the league tables, and that discipline, behaviour and expulsion rates are worse than in smaller schools. I am chair of governors of a titan school – an adjective now sadly likely to become a pejorative description of failure within the education system – and I don't recognise my school at all in this analysis.

Against the Grain: 'Students need to feel valued and trusted'

Alan Mortiboys is Professor of Educational Development at Birmingham City University. He argues that university lecturers should teach with more emotional intelligence.

The Philanthropist, Donmar Warehouse, London

Academia painted as moral minefield in Molière rework

Leading article: Could do better

Focus: The Mo I knew: reckless, funny, a maker of enemies - but a world-class practical joker

Mo Mowlam was one of Britain's most popular public figures. But, says Andy McSmith, who knew her well, she was even more engaging in private

Bethan Marshall: A double whammy of stress and strain

The burden on these exams is bringing them to the point of near collapse
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Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence