Student

For us, the generation which in 2012 took that crucial, final step ahead towards higher education, the changes and challenges of the system came in waves. The first one, and perhaps the one with the biggest impact, was the rise in tuition fees.

Paperback: No One Belongs Here More Than You, By Miranda July

Miranda July has a disarming name that sits well with the artfully intense photo of her on the jacket. Normally these things aren't worth pointing out, but there's enough in this collection of whatever it is that makes her picture so distinctive that you might ponder it while considering a couple of things: Some of her writing has a tendency towards repetition, that seems to grasp at some sense of naivety. ("I still felt summery; I had a summery tableau in mind" or "Vincent was on the shared patio. I'll tell you about this patio. It is shared".) And in places her sexual frankness starts to resemble the unsolicited whisperings of a pervert on a bus. But skip a couple of the stories, squint a little here and there, and this becomes a very interesting collection.

A new electronic voting system in lectures is making a real difference

Andy Sharman looks at a gadget that pushes the right buttons

Leading Article: The union needs to pull together

Mergers of organisations are always difficult. Bringing together two staffs, two cultures and two ways of doing things will cause problems. The merger of the two lecturers' unions, the AUT and Natfhe, to form the University and College Union 18 months ago has been a tortuous process, made more problematic by the fact that lecturers at the "old" universities – the posh ones in membership of the Russell Group and the 94 group – have different traditions to lecturers at the "new" institutions. But this particular merger has also been bedevilled by personality clashes and by what some insiders regard as a lack of openness in decision-making.

Aisha Gill: Police are the key to ending the deaths

If the criminal justice system is to be seen as offering the most appropriate solution to violence against women, then we must question the value of the uniform treatment of cases. It is also essential that we confront the historical lack of action by the police along with their maltreatment of women when responding to "honour" crimes. Many women that I spoke to following the sentencing of Banaz's killers, for example, vowed never to use the criminal justice system to combat violence that they might experience. Of course, this is testimony from women who have not had a satisfactory experience and who do not wish to lose control of their lives in order to protect themselves. However, this does not exonerate the service of blame, as I have also met women who have wanted help from the criminal justice system, but who have failed to get the help they need.

Richard Downes: Large schools aren't such a bad thing

The size of schools has become a hot issue in recent weeks. The Conservatives have jumped on the bandwagon, and press comment appears to support the notion that big schools are bad for pupil behaviour and exam performance. The critics argue that few "titan schools" make it into the top 500 secondary schools in the league tables, and that discipline, behaviour and expulsion rates are worse than in smaller schools. I am chair of governors of a titan school – an adjective now sadly likely to become a pejorative description of failure within the education system – and I don't recognise my school at all in this analysis.

Against the Grain: 'Students need to feel valued and trusted'

Alan Mortiboys is Professor of Educational Development at Birmingham City University. He argues that university lecturers should teach with more emotional intelligence.

The Philanthropist, Donmar Warehouse, London

Academia painted as moral minefield in Molière rework

Leading article: Could do better

Focus: The Mo I knew: reckless, funny, a maker of enemies - but a world-class practical joker

Mo Mowlam was one of Britain's most popular public figures. But, says Andy McSmith, who knew her well, she was even more engaging in private

Bethan Marshall: A double whammy of stress and strain

The burden on these exams is bringing them to the point of near collapse
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The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss