Student

For us, the generation which in 2012 took that crucial, final step ahead towards higher education, the changes and challenges of the system came in waves. The first one, and perhaps the one with the biggest impact, was the rise in tuition fees.

Cottrell: 'It is one of my duties to educate you politicians in military and scientific issues,' he told MPs

Sir Alan Cottrell: Government's Scientific Adviser who worked to establish safe nuclear power

For some 70 years the impact of Sir Alan Cottrell's work on the basic understanding of materials and its application to engineering structures, his academic leadership, his role of Scientific Adviser to the Government, and his contributions to safe nuclear energy, have been immense. He was the most influential physical metallurgist of the 20th century. Through his pioneering researches, and as an educator, he influenced countless students, scientists and engineers and will continue to do so. His papers and books are remarkable for their clarity.

Conference to highlight benefits of gaming

Gaming may sometimes be seen as a pastime which subverts the mind of players but a conference in Nottingham later this year aims to show how they can make a positive difference to people's lives.

How 'peace provocateurs' are defusing religious tensions in Indonesia

A Christian girl has her arm hacked off in a Muslim neighbourhood, and everyone in this tropical island city expects more trouble to follow.

Roseberry: lecturer, writer, scholar, organist, broadcaster, teacher, pianist, conductor, editor and enthusiast. The sheer breadth of his intellect making him an inspirational guide for generations of aspiring musicians

Eric Roseberry: Scholar of Britten and Shostakovich

Eric Roseberry enriched the world of music in a variety of ways. He was a lecturer, writer, scholar, organist, broadcaster, teacher, pianist, conductor, editor and enthusiast, the sheer breadth of his intellect making him an inspirational guide for generations of aspiring musicians.

The modern fix: Do self-help books really work?

Few subjects are quite so divisive – but self-help books have become a billion-dollar business. With four 'classics' of the genre about to be republished, Nick Duerden goes searching for enlightenment.

BMA to meet over pension reforms

Doctors' leaders will meet today to consider their next move in the bitter row over the Government's controversial pension reforms, including the possibility of a ballot for industrial action.

Teaching union rejects pension deal

Leaders of a teaching union today rejected the Government's controversial public sector pension reforms, delivering a fresh blow to the coalition's hopes of ending the long-running dispute.

England has suffered a bigger cut than other parts of the UK, with a 31 per cent reduction in courses

The tuition paradox: You pay more money, you get less choice

The past six years have seen a spectacular reduction in the number of courses taught by universities, as the impact of higher fees begins to be felt

The Golden Scales, By Parker Bilal

Parker Bilal is the pseudonym of the Sudanese novelist Jamal Mahjoub, who, like many "literary" writers, is venturing into the detective genre. The setting is present-day Cairo, where in a broken-down houseboat on the Nile, former police inspector Makana is operating as a reluctant private eye. He has few friends – mainly writers, painters and musicians – and his landlady lives in a shack constructed of old crates and jerry cans.

Amateurs in Eden, By Joanna Hodgkin

Literary biography is haunted by the ghosts of the wives of famous writers, most of whom had a pretty rough ride. Catherine Hogarth (Dickens), Jane Wells, Nora Barnacle (Joyce), Vivienne Eliot: a literary wife's lot was rarely a happy one, and most of the time she went unnoticed. In this account of her mother Nancy's first marriage to novelist and travel writer Lawrence Durrell, Joanna Hodgkin is mindful enough of a history that places wives on the margins. This is not just a memoir of her mother. This is the history of a literary wife.

DVD: Borgen: Season 1 (15)

"Caesar was murdered by his friends, too." Denmark's answer to The West Wing involves a lot of walking and talking along corridors, spin-doctoring, conniving and clandestine meetings at the dead of night.

Applications fall by record 8.7% as fees rise pinches

Universities have suffered the steepest fall in applications since records began, with the number of British students seeking a place this autumn plummeting by 8.7 per cent as the true impact of tuition fee rises is felt.

Two teaching unions accept pension reforms

Members of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers have voted to back the Government's revised pensions deal. Some 91.6 per cent of ATL members voted in favour of the deal, thrashed out after a one-day strike in November with six other teaching unions.

Juror jailed for six months after looking up defendant on Google

A "highly intelligent" juror who used the internet to discover that a defendant in a criminal trial had previously been charged with rape was jailed for six months yesterday for contempt of court.

Invisible Ink: No 107 - Hillary Waugh

There are many sub-groups within the mystery genre, but one strand resurfaces with metronomic regularity: the police procedural. Readers love to see how investigations unfold, but real-life accounts of detection often involve relentless rounds of doorstep interviews and checking records, which don't make for high drama.

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Unhappy days: Resistance spy turned Nobel prize winner Samuel Beckett
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Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson voice the show’s heroes
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices
Could our smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases via Health Kit and Google Fit?

Could smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases?

Health Kit and Google Fit have been described as "the beginning of a health revolution"
Ryanair has turned on the 'charm offensive' but can we learn to love the cut-price carrier again?

Can we learn to love Ryanair again?

Four recent travellers give their verdicts on the carrier's improved customer service
Billionaire founder of Spanx launches range of jeans that offers

Spanx launches range of jeans

The jeans come in two styles, multiple cuts and three washes and will go on sale in the UK in October
10 best over-ear headphones

Aural pleasure: 10 best over-ear headphones

Listen to your favourite tracks with this selection, offering everything from lambskin earmuffs to stainless steel
Commonwealth Games 2014: David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end

Commonwealth Games

David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end
UCI Mountain Bike World Cup 2014: Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings

UCI Mountain Bike World Cup

Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash