Hugh Hefner

The Homecoming, Swan Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

When Peter Hall founded the RSC in 1961, one of his guiding principles was that Shakespeare should be presented in dynamic, mutually illuminating relation to new playwrights. Harold Pinter was the linchpin of this policy. So, as the company celebrates its 50th birthday, it's fitting that it should programme a major revival of one the classic Pinter plays premiered under its auspices – even if the Swan Theatre, with its thrust stage and stacked, horse-shoe-shaped seating is an awkward space for such an intrinsically proscenium arch drama as The Homecoming (1965).

Hugh Hefner: ''I am still very romantic. Being in love completes me'

I was very conservative as a teenager I was raised in a Puritan home and I was planning to get married to a girl from high-school, once we graduated. But right before we tied the knot, she had an affair. It was devastating for me; she had been the only person I'd had sex with and it doomed the marriage.

Playboy controversy? I'm all ears

Playboy's attempts to win over Indonesian readers have ended in protests and prison. Here, though, it's business as usual, says Ian Burrell

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Frank Frazetta: Influential artist who worked on the ‘Conan the

A hugely muscled barbarian brandishes a broadsword, defending an impossibly nubile maiden from some hideous enemy: Frank Frazetta's cover paintings for the paperback editions of Conan the Barbarian captured the essence of heroic fantasy, and were credited with turning Robert E Howard's pulp magazine stories into a best-selling franchise that eventually spawned the Arnold Schwarzenegger films.

50 years of the bunny girl: Hugh Hefner on life with a controversial

It's now 50 years since the first Playboy Bunnies donned their tails, waggled their ears and performed the strange contortion known as the Bunny Dip to serve drinks to their suit-and-tie-wearing customers. When the original Playboy Club opened in Chicago in 1960, the ideal customer was "somebody with money and taste", as Hugh Hefner, the brand's now 84-year-old founder, tells me raspingly from his LA mansion. And he got such beaux sabreurs in droves to the Chicago, New York, London and myriad other Playboy establishments that were to follow. The Bunnies and what he calls their "clean, healthy, girl-next-door beauty" were, of course, the come-on – and, according to Hefner, the most crucial decision he made was to add collars and cuffs to their uniform: "Before that," he declares, "it looked like a bathing suit; they gave it elegance."

Hollywood sign spared from developers

The Hollywood sign has been spared from urban sprawl and will stand unobscured to welcome future actors, writers and Austrian bodybuilders, California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger said.