News Kate Moss' long-awaited Playboy 60th Anniversary cover was unveiled online today

The British supermodel posed as the cover star for the men’s magazine’s 60th anniversary issue

Home And Away: 'The trouble with visitors' books? Negative remarks are there for posterity'

A couple of months ago, Jane and I finally got round to putting visitors' books in our two holiday cottages, inviting "comments and suggestions". For six years, we had resisted, not least because, on perusing a few visitors' books down the years, we have ourselves recoiled slightly. The most disconcerting comment of all was at Cliveden, the swish country-house hotel, where we stayed in a suitably fancy room for one night about 15 years ago. "Great rumpy-pumpy in the Canadian hot tub" our immediate predecessors had written, which not only put us right off the Canadian hot tub, but also took the edge off climbing into the vast four-poster, knowing that the last people in it were the sort of folk who say "rumpy-pumpy".

The 5-minute Interview: Olivia Lichtenstein, Director and novelist

'I swam in Hugh Hefner's pool when I was dating a Chippendale'

Will Elder: Comic-book artist who drew for 'Mad' magazine and co-created 'Little Annie Fanny' for 'Playboy'

The American satirist and comic-book artist Will (at times Bill) Elder was one of the last surviving denizens of the Crypt of Terror – sometimes the Vault of Horror, on occasion the Haunt of Fear – in other words the downtown New York editorial offices of EC Comics, unequivocally the finest and most influential (as well as the most notorious) producer of comic books in the 20th century.

John Phillip Law: Actor best known for 'Barbarella'

An imposingly tall, blond actor, John Phillip Law made his strongest impression on screen in the outlandish science-fiction fantasy Barbarella (1968), playing the handsome blind angel who travels with the space-age heroine (Jane Fonda) through vast galaxies to find the panacea that will enable him to fly again. Despite notable roles in several other films, he never quite broke through as a major star, and spent many years starring in Italian-made action films and straight-to-video fare.

James Lawton: Scholes enjoys his red-letter day as Gerrard is ruthlessly eclipsed

England's Steve McClaren has already been rejected once by Paul Scholes, who for several weeks now has been conducting a master-class in the art and the vision required to play in midfield as a consistent match-winning presence rather than an occasional virtuoso contributor. McClaren apparently took up a mildly beseeching posture while making his first request. Now he should go all the way. He should get down on his hands and knees.

Obituary: Allan Carr

THE PRODUCER of the screen musical Grease and the Tony Award-winning stage musical La Cage Aux Folles, Allan Carr was a colourful Broadway and Hollywood figure whose flamboyantly gay life style and wild parties were as noteworthy as his many show-business activities.

The Hefner roadshow, live and unstapled

`The Bunny is Back' was written all over her chest and his face. The chest is Heather Kozar's, Playboy Playmate of the Year. The face is Hugh Hefner's, still leering after all these years.

The Irritations of Modern Life: 38. Lavatory attendants

BUNNY GIRLS at Hugh Hefner's Playboy mansion notoriously visited the bathroom in pairs. For me, at school, lavatory cubicles were places to hide out with mates, the fashion being to squeeze in as many as possible, like students in a Mini.

Obituary: Ray Russell

RAY RUSSELL specialised in the mid-century equivalent of the conte cruel, a potent and often grisly mix of grand guignol, sick humour and American gothic (in a line that runs directly from Poe through H.P. Lovecraft and now takes in such chroniclers of the putrefying psyches as Bret Easton Ellis). His chief plot elements - or at any rate the ones he utilised with what seemed the greatest facility and enthusiasm - were torture (chiefly of the medieval variety), perversion, sexual violence, grotesqueries, and irony of the most dreadful kind.

Books: Paperback round-up

The Last Resort by Alison Lurie, Vintage pounds 6.99. If Alison Lurie's characters fret about the disintegrating ozone layer, perishing rainforests and HIV, they do so in the context of a witty social comedy that undermines their own existence. In her first novel for 10 years, the former Pulitzer prize-winner sharpens her satirical skills on 46-year-old Jenny, a "walking anachronism" who has devoted her life to her naturalist husband, Wilkie Walker. In exchange, this almost stereotypically selfish male exploits her intelligence in his work without crediting her contributions. Lurie sets up a predatory-hetero, caring-homosexual dichotomy with a lesbian cat among the pigeons in the shape of Lee. At their age, they should all know better, but Lurie ensnares them in a folie a trois that subtly pinpoints the desperation underlying social relations. However, Lurie cannot live for too long in the shadows, and the transitory community of Florida's Key West gives "the world's most enjoyable author" plenty of room to manoeuvre in her tragi-comedy of love and mortality. Good- humoured self-awareness triumphs over all, and those characters mired in political correctness and self-importance receive a strong dose of Lurie's spiky irony.

Who's suing whom: Duke defends his family domain

THE Most Noble John George Vanderbilt Henry Spencer- Churchill, Eleventh Duke of Marlborough, has taken legal action against a firm based in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, over the right to register "BLENHEIM-PALACE.CO- .UK" as a domain name on the Internet.

Books: Egg and sperm race

Laurie Taylor reads a believe-it-or-not guide to sexual excess
Life and Style
love + sex A new study has revealed the average size - but does that leave men outside the 'normal' range being thought of as 'abnormal'?
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The Palace of Westminster is falling down, according to John Bercow
voices..says Matthew Norman
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Steve Bruce and Gus Poyet clash
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Graham Norton said Irish broadcaster RTE’s decision to settle was ‘moronic’
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Jake and Dinos Chapman were motivated by revenge to make 'Bring me the Head of Franco Toselli! '
arts + ents Shapero Modern Gallery to show explicit Chapman Brothers film
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Kurt Cobain performing for 'MTV Unplugged' in New York, shortly before his death
music Brett Morgen's 'Cobain: Montage of Heck' debunks many of the myths surrounding the enigmatic singer
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
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Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn