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Eurocom bringing the adventures of Harry, Ron and Hermione to Microsoft's Kinect peripheral.

Reviews: New Films

AFFLICTION (15)

Cinema: New Films

AFFLICTION (15)

Harry Potter goes to Hollywood

HARRY POTTER, the schoolboy wizard adored by 156,000 adults and children since the publication last summer of J K Rowling's book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, has been bought up by Hollywood in a "seven-figure" film deal.

Love in a distinctly chilly climate; FILM

Lars Von Trier's Breaking the Waves (18) is a film that seems to be making strong men weep and cynics attend in reverent silence, and not without reason. Though you might easily take it for a bleak social drama in its early reels, it soon dawns that Von Trier is really thrashing around in religious dilemmas. Like Bergman or, more aptly, like his great fellow countryman Carl Theodore Dreyer, he's grappling with some profoundly vexed (and no less profoundly unmodish) notions about spirituality, redemption, miracles and the nature of good - indeed, of sanctity. In Emily Watson he has a wonderfully true and harrowing female lead, who richly deserves her "Felix" award as European Actress of the Year. Working with cinematographer Robby Muller and others, he has arrived at an idiosyncratic and apt style for his harsh fable, at once intimate and grandiose. It's impressive work. Yet it has a faint air of the bully, too, as though insisting that not to take it on its own grimly earnest terms would be cheap, possibly heretical. There are, however, causes for doubt.

Choice: The critics: FILM

Babe A jolly farmyard adventure which follows a pig who thinks he's a sheepdog. Produced by Mad Max's George Miller, it has as much darkness as your average fairy tale and no more - the defining mood is fun. It may make you go "aah" at pigs every now and then, but chances are it won't stop you eating them.

AND WATCH THESE FACES . . .

Ian Hart We know Ian Hart as John Lennon, whom he played in last year's Backbeat, and again in The Hours and the Times, a low-budget drama all about the never-quite-consummated love between Lennon and Brian Epstein. Both performances were stunning, (and each show ed a different side of the rogue Beatle) but in 1995 Hart will show that he has other strings to his bow (or guitar). He appears in no less than three British features: with Hugh Grant in The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill and Came Down a Mountain; in Clo ckwork Mice, Gary Sinyor's follow-up to Leon the Pig Farmer; and as the lead in Ken Loach's Spanish Civil War drama Land and Freedom.
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