Bill to encourage more people into 'sustained employment'

The Government is to press ahead with reforms of the welfare system, including moves to reduce the number of people on incapacity benefit by a million and increase the employment rate.

Increase in asthma linked to Caesareans

Eight-year study of 3,000 children finds 80 per cent rise in risk

Confessions of an angry insomniac

Gayle Green hasn't had a good night's sleep in 50 years. And yes, of course she's tried hot baths and warm milk...

Parents warned over measles epidemic

A stark warning about the dangers of measles is to be sent to the parents of three million unvaccinated children in an unprecedented move to increase uptake of the MMR vaccination, the Government will announce today.

Paradise lost: climate change forces South Sea islanders to seek sanctuary abroad

After years of fruitless appeals for decisive action on climate change, the tiny South Pacific nation of Kiribati has concluded that it is doomed. Yesterday its President, Anote Tong, used World Environment Day to request international help to evacuate his country before it disappears.

Roger Brown: Do we need to have world-class universities?

There is much talk about the need to establish "world class" universities. Some believe that the Government has a covert plan to create them by further concentrating public funding for research in traditional universities, while allowing them to charge what they like by raising the cap on tuition fees. All this, they say, will allow our universities to compete with the American institutions that dominate the international league tables. But what exactly is a "world class" university, and what advantages do they bring to the countries in which they are located and, indeed, the wider international community?

Mother's diet linked to baby's sex

The trend to skip breakfast could be altering the male/female balance in the population, scientists say.

Stern warns that climate change is far worse than 2006 estimate

Lord Stern, the economist whose report on climate change helped galvanise world leaders behind the green energy movement when it was published 18 months ago, has admitted that the situation is far worse than the assumptions that formed the basis of his ground-breaking report.

UN report demands urgent action on soaring food prices

The global food crisis became official yesterday when the UN called for urgent intergovernmental action and farming reforms to tackle the soaring prices that are plunging millions of people into potentially deadly poverty.

CBI attacks Treasury over growing tax burden on UK plc

Employers' organisation warns that businesses face £4.2bn hike as pressure grows on Bank of England to cut rates this week

Leading article: A lacklustre Budget, in the shadow of Mr Brown

There were times yesterday when it was hard to believe that there had been a change of Chancellor, so reminiscent of his predecessor's register and cadences was the Budget speech of Alistair Darling. There was, though, an extra note of sombreness, which defined the difference between 2007 and 2008. And this was not just – as Mr Darling tried repeatedly to insist – because of the uncertainty of the global climate to which our admirably open economy was inevitably exposed. It reflected a sense of home-grown insecurity as well.

Japan's concrete ceiling

'Glass ceiling' hardly does justice to the sexism rife in Japanese business life. Anne Penketh reports on the battle for equality

Suicide rate of young men falls to 30-year low

Suicide rates in young men have fallen to their lowest level since the 1970s, marking the end of a three-decade long rise.

Record fall in number of homeowners in 2007

The number of people who own their home fell by a record 83,000 in 2007, according to figures published by Halifax Bank yesterday. There are now only 85,000 more households in England occupied by their owners than there were five years ago. The preceding five-year period, meanwhile, saw an increase of 697,000.

Outside View: Take care, Mr Darling: the pips you plan to squeeze are leaving

We're broke, and it's getting worse. Alistair Darling will see to that. Seasoned readers may recall a previous dark time, when a Labour Chancellor had his back to the wall and started lashing out at taxpayers. That was Denis Healey, who faced with chaotic Government finances promised to "squeeze the rich until the pips squeak". The ensuing tax carnage notably failed to make any impact on public finances. People simply walked – the great brain drain of the 1970s. Are we seeing something similar now?

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003
Barbara Woodward: Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with the growing economic superpower

Our woman in Beijing builds a new relationship

Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with growing economic power
Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer. But the only British soldier to be awarded the Victoria Cross in Afghanistan has both

Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer

Beware of imitations, but the words of the soldier awarded the Victoria Cross were the real thing, says DJ Taylor
Alexander McQueen: The catwalk was a stage for the designer's astonishing and troubling vision

Alexander McQueen's astonishing vision

Ahead of a major retrospective, Alexander Fury talks to the collaborators who helped create the late designer's notorious spectacle
New BBC series savours half a century of food in Britain, from Vesta curries to nouvelle cuisine

Dinner through the decades

A new BBC series challenged Brandon Robshaw and his family to eat their way from the 1950s to the 1990s
Philippa Perry interview: The psychotherapist on McDonald's, fancy specs and meeting Grayson Perry on an evening course

Philippa Perry interview

The psychotherapist on McDonald's, fancy specs and meeting Grayson Perry on an evening course
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef recreates the exoticism of the Indonesian stir-fry

Bill Granger's Indonesian stir-fry recipes

Our chef was inspired by the south-east Asian cuisine he encountered as a teenager
Chelsea vs Tottenham: Harry Kane was at Wembley to see Spurs beat the Blues and win the Capital One Cup - now he's their great hope

Harry Kane interview

The striker was at Wembley to see Spurs beat the Blues and win the Capital One Cup - now he's their great hope
The Last Word: For the good of the game: why on earth don’t we leave Fifa?

Michael Calvin's Last Word

For the good of the game: why on earth don’t we leave Fifa?