Bill to encourage more people into 'sustained employment'

The Government is to press ahead with reforms of the welfare system, including moves to reduce the number of people on incapacity benefit by a million and increase the employment rate.

Increase in asthma linked to Caesareans

Eight-year study of 3,000 children finds 80 per cent rise in risk

Confessions of an angry insomniac

Gayle Green hasn't had a good night's sleep in 50 years. And yes, of course she's tried hot baths and warm milk...

Parents warned over measles epidemic

A stark warning about the dangers of measles is to be sent to the parents of three million unvaccinated children in an unprecedented move to increase uptake of the MMR vaccination, the Government will announce today.

Paradise lost: climate change forces South Sea islanders to seek sanctuary abroad

After years of fruitless appeals for decisive action on climate change, the tiny South Pacific nation of Kiribati has concluded that it is doomed. Yesterday its President, Anote Tong, used World Environment Day to request international help to evacuate his country before it disappears.

Roger Brown: Do we need to have world-class universities?

There is much talk about the need to establish "world class" universities. Some believe that the Government has a covert plan to create them by further concentrating public funding for research in traditional universities, while allowing them to charge what they like by raising the cap on tuition fees. All this, they say, will allow our universities to compete with the American institutions that dominate the international league tables. But what exactly is a "world class" university, and what advantages do they bring to the countries in which they are located and, indeed, the wider international community?

Mother's diet linked to baby's sex

The trend to skip breakfast could be altering the male/female balance in the population, scientists say.

Stern warns that climate change is far worse than 2006 estimate

Lord Stern, the economist whose report on climate change helped galvanise world leaders behind the green energy movement when it was published 18 months ago, has admitted that the situation is far worse than the assumptions that formed the basis of his ground-breaking report.

UN report demands urgent action on soaring food prices

The global food crisis became official yesterday when the UN called for urgent intergovernmental action and farming reforms to tackle the soaring prices that are plunging millions of people into potentially deadly poverty.

CBI attacks Treasury over growing tax burden on UK plc

Employers' organisation warns that businesses face £4.2bn hike as pressure grows on Bank of England to cut rates this week

Leading article: A lacklustre Budget, in the shadow of Mr Brown

There were times yesterday when it was hard to believe that there had been a change of Chancellor, so reminiscent of his predecessor's register and cadences was the Budget speech of Alistair Darling. There was, though, an extra note of sombreness, which defined the difference between 2007 and 2008. And this was not just – as Mr Darling tried repeatedly to insist – because of the uncertainty of the global climate to which our admirably open economy was inevitably exposed. It reflected a sense of home-grown insecurity as well.

Japan's concrete ceiling

'Glass ceiling' hardly does justice to the sexism rife in Japanese business life. Anne Penketh reports on the battle for equality

Suicide rate of young men falls to 30-year low

Suicide rates in young men have fallen to their lowest level since the 1970s, marking the end of a three-decade long rise.

Record fall in number of homeowners in 2007

The number of people who own their home fell by a record 83,000 in 2007, according to figures published by Halifax Bank yesterday. There are now only 85,000 more households in England occupied by their owners than there were five years ago. The preceding five-year period, meanwhile, saw an increase of 697,000.

Outside View: Take care, Mr Darling: the pips you plan to squeeze are leaving

We're broke, and it's getting worse. Alistair Darling will see to that. Seasoned readers may recall a previous dark time, when a Labour Chancellor had his back to the wall and started lashing out at taxpayers. That was Denis Healey, who faced with chaotic Government finances promised to "squeeze the rich until the pips squeak". The ensuing tax carnage notably failed to make any impact on public finances. People simply walked – the great brain drain of the 1970s. Are we seeing something similar now?

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
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Innovative study in the US produces remarkable results
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Aviation history is littered with grand failures

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Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

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Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
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