A billion people go to bed hungry each night. Finally, Britain is doing something

FINALLY, THE British government has put its money where its mouth is. For years British chancellors - from Nigel Lawson and John Major to Kenneth Clarke and then Gordon Brown - have exhorted the international community to do something about the burden of Third World debt. For years poor nations and British aid agencies have told those same chancellors that exhortation was not enough; action was needed. And for years, on the advice of Treasury officials, politicians have adopted a stance of "if everyone won't do it, we can't do it alone".

Podium: Hunger and poverty can be conquered

From a speech by the President of Germany before the Global Development Network, meeting in Bonn

Letter: Turn again, Norris

Sir: The "prosperous southern communities of Esher and Wokingham" should not be led astray by the Bristol University Townsend Centre report that they have better health and greater life expectation than poorer parts of the UK community ("Preventable deaths rise as health gap widens", 2 December).

Letter: Paying for pollution

Sir: For the last 200 years, wealth creation in the industrialised countries has been running up an environmental debt on the global account (" `Too late to stop global warming' ", 16 September). The scale of this debt dwarfs the financial debt owed by developing countries to their polluting creditors. Because of this, such "external" debts should be cancelled forthwith.

Free-trade supporters must speak freely

The idea of free trade is under attack as never before in the post-war era

Road deaths are lowest recorded

FURTHER MEASURES to reduce road casualties - including new speed limits, driving standards and vehicle design - will be announced by the Government this autumn.

Sorry, Mr Hague, but you're fighting the last election again

He is certainly playing to one of his party's strengths - its formidable reputation for tax-cutting

Scientists link breast cancer to artificial light

ARTIFICIAL LIGHT may be a factor in the development of breast cancer, according to scientists who are to carry out urgent studies into a hormone that is produced during sleep.

Right of Reply: Haruko Fukuda

RECENT WEEKS have seen much argument over the UK Government's decision to sell more than half of the country's gold stocks. Your editorial of 6 July introduced an interesting new twist in arguing that the substitution of paper money for gold is an example of democratisation. I disagree.

Health: When life or death is down to chance

A car crash nearly killed Tracey Caplan. Luckily she ended up at one of the few hospitals that could save her.

G8 `crumbs' for world's poorest

THE GROUP of Eight industrial countries are only offering "crumbs of comfort" to the world's poorest countries with their latest initiatives for improved debt relief, a leading campaign group said.

The Balkans Truce: Serbia's generals prepare to face the final shame

IN AN ultimate humiliation for the Serbs, the Yugoslav army high command will meet a British general on the Macedonian border today to agree the terms of its withdrawal from Kosovo. General Mike Jackson will meet the commanders on the same border where, weeks before, hundreds of thousands of ethnic Albanians streamed across in a tide of misery and desperation not seen in Europe since the forced migrations at the end of the Second World War.
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Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
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Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
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Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

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Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

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Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
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In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
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Holocaust Memorial Day

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Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness