Jack Nicholson

Film review: The Big Wedding (15)

A wedding comedy called The Big Wedding doesn't look likely to prize the virtues of wit or invention, though somehow it has managed to bolster its puny credentials with a top-drawer cast.

Woody Allen, Hannibal Lecter & me: The Best Picture Oscar winners that

When people see the label Academy Award Winner," said Martin Scorsese, "they go and see that movie." Indeed they do – not just because the Oscar means it's the best film of the year, but because they can measure themselves against it: they can see how much it speaks to them or moves them, or conjures up the time they're living in. Along with the presidential election, the Oscar provides a mirror to Americans of the kind of people they are and tells them: this is the best we can do, apparently. Sometimes they may dislike what they see (Kramer vs Kramer? Are you sure? George W Bush? Are you sure?), but they're stuck with it.

Vinnie Jones: The caring side of bullet-tooth Tony

The Brian Viner Interview: No, Vinnie Jones has not gone soft living in La La Land, but he helps newly-arrived Brits in Hollywood, wants to curb anti-social behaviour and has a plea for his old mate Gazza

Dennis Hopper: Two sides of a Hollywood legend

Dennis Hopper, who has died aged 74, was more than just a hell-raising actor – he was also a gifted photographer. His biographer, Robert Sellers, considers an extraordinary career

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Nancy Meyers: The rom-com queen

She's the most successful female director in Hollywood and she's just chalked up another hit at the box office. What's Nancy Meyers' secret?

New moon rising: return of the werewolf

Forget vampires. A raft of new werewolf films looks set to take horror to hairy new levels. It's time to stock up on the silver bullets, says Stephen Applebaum

Decade of decadence: Nicholson, Polanski and Hollywood in the

The Roman Polanski case offers an insight into the strange world of Hollywood in the Seventies. Just how shocking was the behaviour of directors and producers when so many classic films were being made? Geoffrey Macnab looks behind closed doors