Voices

This definition of anti-Semitism has been too stretched for too long

Cinema: The thief, his wife and her sister

JOHN BOORMAN has always been a myth-maker, a teller of tall tales. For instance, that business in Excalibur with the Lady in the Lake - did it actually happen? Well, no, but hard-nosed realists don't do sword sorcery. What about those sunlit reminiscences in Hope and Glory? Was that yarn about the fish and the German air-raid based on fact? I wouldn't bet on it. The mythic seems to haunt Boorman's production schedule, too. It was rumoured that some diabolic influence was behind the strange near- fatal illness that struck him down on the set of The Exorcist II. Poppycock, probably. But it's a fantastic story. And why bother with anaemic reportage, his films suggest, when you can have full-blooded folklore instead?

Film: The eccentric Great Uncle of film

Cinemagoers won't know how to react to Alan Rudolph's new film `Afterglow' - which is just what he wants. James Mottram on a director who delights in life's contradictions

Letter: Life is sweet at fifty

Sir: Further to Bel Mooney's thoughts on "How it really feels to be fifty" (28 May), herewith a list of the benefits of celebrating your 50th birthday (mine's on 11 June if anyone wants to send gifts):

Film: The gong show

"The statuette is the perfect symbol of the picture business," said Frances Marion the year after the Academy Awards were launched in 1927, "a powerful athletic body clutching a gleaming sword, with half of his head - the part that holds the brains - completely sliced off."

Behind the song

You know the hit, but do you know how it came to be written? What was the inspiration? Today: Waterloo Sunset by The Kinks

Putting his stamp on fame

The wispy grey hair is now his distinguished trademark. Terence Stamp is a peculiar hybrid between Cockney gent and a Mayfair natural. Women simply adore him. Men want to shake his hand.

Creative Industries: Film: Projecting into the future

Creative industry outlook: we're big on local heroes, but the challenge for sectors from film to software is to become a force on the global stage

Human Condition: When being beautiful is not enough

If one of Britain's most famous beauties felt she had to have a facelift, what hope for the rest of us? writes Emma Cook

Book: a book that changed me

Bel Mooney on George Eliot's 'Middlemarch'

THEATRE: Third time unlucky for Julie Christie

There Was an Uncle Vanya back in the Seventies and an Old Times in 1995. And until last week that was it. So it was a rare event when Julie Christie walked on stage at Chichester. In her mid-50s, she still looks terrific: the high cheek bones, long jaw line and wide mouth have acquired - if anything - a delicate tautness. In black overcoat with black gloves she appears as the ice-cool blonde: elegant and intriguingly remote. She clearly knows the value of good bone structure, as she keeps tilting the famous face into each available source of light. For 10 minutes we gaze and gawp and think about our favourite bits from Dr Zhivago. After that we begin to hope she's not playing the main character. For the one thing Christie can do on film and can't do on stage - as becomes increasingly apparent across two long hours of Suzanna Andler - is hold our attention.

Somewhere my love...Pasternak's passionate letters to his own Lara set to fetch pounds 500,000

Poignant exchange during Stalin purges

THEATRE Billy Liar Liverpool Playhouse

On page, stage, large and small screen, Keith Waterhouse's Billy Liar has, since 1959, become a minor proverbial figure in English culture. Some of this is obviously due to Billy's having taken his place among the motley escape committee of Jimmys, Arthurs and Vics who were then breaking out of the oubliette of condescension labelled "provincial" and "working class". Much ink has been, and still is, spilt in analysing the cultural shift of which they were part.

D'Angerous liaisons

Margaret Drabble being snide about reviewers? Tut-tut, says Hugo Barnacle; The Witch of Exmoor by Margaret Drabble, Viking, pounds 16

Film: Video round-up/ The white heat of technophobia

The director Donald Cammell committed suicide on 24 April this year. His curriculum vitae suggests that he was someone who could make Stanley Kubrick look prolific. He edged into the film business armed with a psychedelically inclined imagination and a screenplay, a heist thriller filmed in 1967 as Duffy. But Performance made his name.

Taken as wed

DAVID LEAN by Kevin Brownlow, Richard Cohen Books pounds 25
Arts and Entertainment
Sydney and Melbourne are locked in a row over giant milk crates
art
News
Kenny Ireland, pictured in 2010.
peopleActor, from House of Cards and Benidorm, was 68
News
A scene from the video shows students mock rioting
newsEnd-of-year leaver's YouTube film features staging of a playground gun massacre
Travel
travel
Voices
A family sit and enjoy a quiet train journey
voicesForcing us to overhear dull phone conversations is an offensive act, says Simon Kelner
News
i100This Instagram photo does not prove Russian army is in Ukraine
News
Morrissey pictured in 2013
people
Sport
sportVan Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Environment
View from the Llanberis Track to the mountain lake Llyn
Du’r Arddu
environmentA large chunk of Mount Snowdon, in north Wales, is up for sale
Life and Style
Martha Stewart wrote an opinion column for Time magazine this week titled “Why I Love My Drone”
lifeLifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot... to take photos of her farm
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices