Arts and Entertainment

Mohammed Ali  used to boast that when boxing,  he would float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. So it is with Germiane Greer. She writes lightly, gracefully even when agitating for a cause. But the words still sting. And unsettle. Here she consciously creates a quasi-religious epic out of a part of her remarkable life when she decided to restore a small, wrecked rainforest in Australia, her homeland. The tone is apocalyptic, themes existential and critical: (wo)man not against, but ardently for wondrous, pitiless and predatory nature. She, the Lionheart, is awed, meets devastation, fears cataclysms, intuits prophecies, bears historical and biological guilt,  seeks redemption and takes stupendous, fervent  action. It really is some story.

Sailing: After six days on land all I want is to return to sea

Part 4: Emma Richards, the skipper of Pindar, yearns for the restart of the Around Alone single-handed round-the-world yacht race

Desire, decadence and death in Lahore

The legendary feuds of the Mughal Empire underlie this teasing novel of love and corruption.

Do dendrologists ever get a hangover?

`Long John Silver, not John "Long" Silver; Sugar Ray Robinson, not Ray "Sugar" Robinson. Why is this?'

BROADCASTING: PETER YORK ON ADS No 290: BUDWEISER

Frogs are like chimps - they've got good verbal skills, they are nicely syncopated and they're good to direct. People like them; they feature as princes in fairy tales and as wooing frogs in nursery rhymes. We don't think of them as jumping green slimeballs and, most Brits anyway, don't think of them as square meals either. They're engaging and lugubrious, like the old judge in Ally McBeal.

Television Review: Deadly Dragons with Steve Irwin

IT ALL comes down to shorts. When David Attenborough goes questing after exotic beasts, he wears shorts, but they look sensible and practical, proper tropical kit. When Steve Irwin goes hunting, his shorts look like something out of Just William - turn out his pockets and you'd expect to find a broken pen-knife, some string, a couple of conkers, and the odd white mouse. Irwin is the Peter Pan of herpetology, an excitable, overgrown Australian schoolboy who has made a career out of going around the world bothering reptiles who were just sitting around trying to mind their own business.

Obituary: David Coombe

DAVID COOMBE was a Fellow of Christ's College, Cambridge, for over 48 years and its Vice-Master from 1980 to 1984. An outline of his academic career gives no indication of the diversity of his interests or the breadth of his reputation - he has been accurately described as the leading botanical ecologist of his generation.

The land of milk and honey

Not to mention Brazilian rhubarb, Koi carp, bamboo glades and Tarzan's Camp - can this really be Cornwall?

Scottish fossil lizard may be the first land-dweller

A SMALL lizard-like animal whose fossilised remains have been found in an ancient Scottish lake bed may have been one of the first creatures to live on dry land, scientists reported yesterday.

Elusive `alligator' is an imitator

A COUNTRY park may have unwittingly stumbled upon a novel way of pulling in the crowds thanks to a rare North American salamander.

Biological spot-the-difference

How do scientists compare one species with another? Richard Dawkins explains

Two-inch lizard to solve long-distance mystery

A TINY lizard less than two inches long may help to solve the mystery of how quickly early human explorers managed to colonise the remote islands of the Pacific Ocean.

In the Sticks: Luck and the lost lizard

YOU KNOW those September storms you get some years when the clouds erect a modesty board between you and the sunshine, and you think: "Oh no, that'll be the summer going then." I got the same feeling about Offa's Truck smacking our car. "Oh no, that'll be the good luck going then." I felt a chill, the sort of draught you get from guardian angel wings when they nip off to the beach for a couple of millennia of celestial surfing. And for a few days it looked like I was right: here came the first little ripples of an advancing weather front of Bad Luck; a season of lost keys, exploding boilers and vengeful ex-husbands.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?