Arts and Entertainment Lizzy Caplan will star in Seth Rogen/James Franco comedy The Interview

Tinseltown Insider

Taylor-Wood, 42, casts leading man, 19, as her husband

It is a rock'n'roll move befitting the woman once known as the "wild child" of the Young British Artists movement.

Ben Barnes: Prince of hearts

Ben Barnes, better known as Caspian, lives in a world of red carpets and hysterical fans. He tells Alice Jones about hero-worship, Narnia, and his new role in Oscar Wilde's famous tale of narcissism

Screen Talk: No want of war

It's springtime for Hitler as far as the studios are concerned with Nazis back big time over the next year or two.

Pandora: What the butler didn't see

Will the troublemaker who is going around saying that leftie pin-up economist Will Hutton has a butler please desist? There is talk that the former newspaper editor, now chief exec of the Work Foundation think-tank (more employee satisfaction means higher productivity), has his door answered by a Jeeves-like fellow in tails. There would be no shame in that: the old school gentleman's gentleman has returned to the sculleries of high society, particularly for occasional party nights, to ferry trays and seat guests.

Preview: Stardust, Riflemaker, Soho Square, London

It came from outer space. Well, sort of...

Advertising: Attempts to nail political zeitgeist just don't ad up

It's 30 years since the Saatchis snatched the political initiative for the Conservatives. But the current Tory media onslaught isn't having the same effect, argues Mark Sellek

Stardust

Bursting at the seams with special effects, big names (Michelle Pfeiffer, Robert De Niro, Peter O'Toole, Ricky Gervais) and an epic storyline about witches, princes and pirates, Matthew Vaughn's fantasy adventure seems to have everything going for it. But maybe that's the problem. There are so many ingredients thrown in that there's no room left for the enchanting, magical atmosphere of Neil Gaiman's source novel. And without that magical atmosphere, we aren't seeing a wondrous fairy tale; we're seeing famous people in fancy dress wandering around a forest.

Charlie Cox: Star turn

Charlie Cox is taking a break from Hollywood to bring Pinter to London's West End. And the experience has proved to be truly terrifying, he tells Charlotte Cripps

Arts: Comic books are for grown-ups

Ten years ago Neil Gaiman taught the British that graphic novels could be literature. Now he's a worldwide cult author. By Marianne Brace

How we met: Guy Ritchie & Matthew Vaughn

Guy Ritchie, 30, grew up in Fulham. He left school at 15 and worked at Island Records. Five years ago, despite being dyslexic, he began to write a film script. The result, `Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels', which he also directed, was released to much acclaim. He won the `Evening Standard' award for Most Promising Newcomer for his directing

Stardust memories

Suzi Quatro is ready to Can the Can, The Rubettes are in their (washable) berets, and Alvin Stardust is Coo-ca-Chooing to anyone who will listen ... Richard Johnson hits the road with Glitz, Blitz & 70s Hitz. Photographs by Philip Sinden

CV: MALCOLM GERRIE Managing director of Initial

I went to Durham University to do a BA in English from 1969 to1972, and then did an extra year at Sunderland Poly to be a teacher. And after that, I went to teach English and drama in a school in a pit village outside Sunderland called Ryhope.

Pop:UNFORGETTABLE: THE NAT KING COLE STORY Garrick Theatre, London

Courageously titled, Unforgettable sets a new benchmark for musical spectaculars without the spectacle. Look, no orchestra! Just a three-piece combo on the stage. And look, no cast! Just Clarke Peters doing everything.

GARDEN NEWCOMERS 4: SHRUBS : GADENING

UNLIKE bedding plants, shrubs cannot be discarded after a season and their ultimate size makes choosing whether or not to grow them an important decision. So the turnover of new varieties is slower and less well publicised than it is with smaller plants. An exception has been the "Barnsley" tree mallow, with porcelain pale flowers, which occurred as a chance seedling in Rosemary Verey's famous garden. This has been the best seller of the Nineties. It flowers all summer, but it grows thuggish in old age, and as it has now made an appearance in so many gardens it could be suffering from over-exposure. The plant that seems set to replace "Barnsley" is a new Lavatera called "Pink Frills", a shrub with better manners and smaller flowers.

BOOK REVIEW / Play it again and again, Sam: Woody Allen on Woody Allen - ed Stig Bjorkman: Faber, pounds 14.99

FOR inspiration, Woody walks. He walks up, down, all around. He walks inside, outside, no doubt in those strange little sunhats of his. It sounds so painful: he says he squeezes out ideas, and if he walks enough eventually they come, enough for plots and scenes and then one-liners. He gets so annoyed when critics and audiences assume his work is mostly autobiographical - he sweats this stuff, he does so much walking.
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Woman who was sent to three Nazi death camps describes how she escaped the gas chamber

Auschwitz liberation 70th anniversary

Woman sent to three Nazi death camps describes surviving gas chamber
DSK, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel

The inside track on France's trial of the year

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel:
As provocative now as they ever were

Sarah Kane season

Why her plays are as provocative now as when they were written
Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of a killing in Iraq 11 years ago

Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of another killing

Japanese mood was against what was seen as irresponsible trips to a vicious war zone
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea