News

Luhman 16B is the nearest brown dwarf to Earth, and the third nearest star system to our solar system

The cloud atlas

They're the most beautiful things that we barely even notice. A new book aims to fix that by finding the most spectacular images in the Met Office archives.

April's heat will not last – May will be showery

This April has been the hottest since records began, and the fourth sunniest April in the past 100 years. However, as is often the case with the UK's unpredictable climate, the good weather will not last for long. Meteorologists say the fine weather this month will be followed by a showery May.

Sale's grand plan for northern sales push hit by unfair local competition

Club had hoped for 20,000-strong crowd at Reebok fixture – but then along came the Manchester derby

Nuclear plant evacuated as aftershock strikes

Workers were evacuated from two nuclear plants yesterday as Japan was rattled by a strong aftershock and tsunami warning.

Britain enjoys warmest day of the year

Britain enjoyed the warmest day of the year today, with forecasters predicting Mediterranean temperatures for the weekend.

Ozone layer damaged by unusually harsh winter

The stratospheric ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the Sun's harmful ultraviolet rays, has been damaged to its greatest-ever extent over the Arctic this winter.

Search for survivors hampered by radiation

The search for bodies and survivors of this month's huge earthquake and tsunami in Japan is being hampered by growing fears of radiation leaking from the stricken nuclear plant in Fukushima.

Reactor radiation reaches Europe

Fallout from Japan's damaged nuclear plant is expected to reach Europe this week, but experts say the particles will be minuscule.

Whatever the weather: Rain and snow for 190 days a year – then summer sun transforms St Petersburg

St Petersburg is situated along the shores of the Neva Bay in the Gulf of Finland; it has a continental climate, moderated somewhat by the Baltic Sea. Because of the city's northerly latitude it experiences a huge variation in daylight hours during the year, ranging from six – in midwinter – to 19 hours a day. Twilight may last all night in early summer, from mid-May to mid-July, and this celebrated time is known as the White Nights.

Nuclear reactor meltdown 'likely' says official

Japanese officials are struggling with a growing nuclear crisis and the threat of multiple meltdowns, two days after the country's north-eastern coast was savaged by a catastrophic earthquake and tsunami.

Queensland devastated again as 'savage' storm brings 190mph winds

A cyclone believed to be the most powerful ever to strike Australia battered towns and tourist centres on the north Queensland coast, with winds of 186 mph ripping buildings apart and cutting power.

UK agency had warning of flooding in Pakistan

The impact of devastating floods that tore through Pakistan last summer affecting more than 20m people and leaving more than 1,500 dead, could have been greatly reduced if information gathered by weather monitors in Europe about imminent rains had been shared with the authorities in Islamabad.

Japan volcano erupts again

A volcano in southern Japan erupted today with its biggest explosion yet, shooting out a huge plume of gas, boulders and ash and breaking windows five miles away.

Battered state braced for cyclone

A cyclone raced raced toward Australia's flood-ravaged northeast yesterday, rattling nerves in a region that has already suffered billions of dollars of damage from a months-long crisis.

Cyclone headed for Australia's flood-ravaged north

A cyclone raced toward Australia's flood-ravaged northeast, rattling nerves in a region that has already suffered billions of dollars worth of damage from a monthslong crisis.

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The eyes have it: Kate Bush
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Fifi Trixibelle Geldof with her mother, Paula Yates, in 1985
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Mario Balotelli in action during his Liverpool debut
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
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Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

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Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

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Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

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