Voices Labour leader Ed Miliband during a Q&A session at the Standard Life building in Edinburgh, Thursday 7 November

Some Labour figures worry that the party leader is overdoing the anti-business rhetoric

The Independent Archive: 5 August 1987 - Why television may bring the House down

Colin Brown reports on MPs' anxieties over appearing on the box

How Prime Ministers Get Their Own Way

TONY BLAIR now operates the most centralised system of government of any modern Prime Minister, according to veteran Whitehall watchers.

Outlook: No answers in executive pay debate

STEPHEN BYERS had the general secretary of the MSF union, Roger Lyons, positively purring with delight yesterday with his promise to "regulate fat cat pay". Never one to miss an opportunity to mix his metaphors, Mr Lyons went on to pronounce that the trade and industry secretary's action would "derail the executive gravy train in Britain".

Parliament: The Sketch: Tory stamp of approval delivers blow to Labour benches

I DON'T suppose Stephen Byers expected quite such a warm welcome for his statement on the Post Office. Members hear-heared with gusto, greeting almost every clause with mutters of approval and ostentatious nodding.

PMs and their deputies: a partnership that rarely works

IN THEORY, a prime minister and his deputy work in tandem to ensure the smooth running of day-to-day government. In practice, the partnership is often fraught with tension.

Eurosceptics hail Blair `victory'

EUROSCEPTICS CLAIMED victory yesterday after supporters of the single currency agreed to tone down their campaign in order to secure the support of Tony Blair.

Blair will back pro-euro campaign

TONY BLAIR has defied critics of his "prepare and decide" policy on the single currency with a surprise decision to join Michael Heseltine and Kenneth Clarke at the head of a nationwide pro-European campaign.

Urban regeneration? We've heard it all before

Cappuccino bars are not the answer, writes Geoffrey Lean

Leading Article: Get off the fence, Mr Blair, and start fighting for the euro

IS TONY Blair the most dangerous man in Britain? In the light of his party's disastrous showing in the European elections - the worst since he became leader - the answer may well be "yes". Dangerous, that is, in the sense that Mr Blair's complacency about Europe has now put the prospect of Britain's ever joining the euro in jeopardy, with all the damaging implications that has for the long-term health of our economy. Mr Blair has no one to blame but himself for the fact that the Conservatives staged such an impressive and unexpected comeback in the impromptu euro- referendum they organised for the electors last week. We now have the appalling prospect of three representatives of the UK Independence Party (which wants us to leave Europe altogether) being sent to the European Parliament. We have reached a turning-point. Either the fight back for the euro starts here - led by the Prime Minister - or the battle will be lost, with incalculable consequences for jobs and prosperity.

European Elections: `Negative' line is disastrous, says Sir Leon

SIR LEON Brittan warned William Hague yesterday that the Tories would suffer another "electoral disaster" at the next general election if they continued their hardline stance on Europe.

Hague will clear out old guard in purge of 'disloyal' MPs

WILLIAM HAGUE will this week begin the purge of the Conservative "old guard" by throwing out senior Tories who expressed support for the breakaway pro-euro party.

The Vote For Europe: End of the Tory truce on Europe

THE FRAGILE truce between the Conservative Party's two factions on Europe was shattered yesterday when nine former MPs and Euro MPs attacked William Hague's hardline policy.

Dome Dome is now Moneyzone-on-Thames

ORGANISERS OF the Millennium Dome yesterday confounded their critics by announcing that the Greenwich-based exhibition had hit its sponsorship targets and found backers for its religious zone.

Outlook: Cutting red tape

THESE DAYS every government comes into power promising to do at least two things: maintain a stable economic environment and reduce the burden of regulation on business. Who can forget the famous "bonfire of red tape" announced by Michael Heseltine in 1994 following which the only thing that actually went up in smoke was his promise.

The Vote for Europe: Blair is `running scared' on the euro, says Hague

WILLIAM HAGUE accused Tony Blair of "running scared" over the single currency yesterday as he sought to exploit the euro's weakness on the currency markets in the campaign for next week's European Parliament elections.
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