News Maths is the only subject where girls still lag behind boys

Girls lack confidence in their ability in maths and science and are therefore put off from applying for jobs in engineering and computing, a new study from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) shows today.

Michelin's missing windows – the Australian connection

Michelin has been searching for months for the original stained glass windows fitted to its former UK headquarters at Michelin House in London, now partly occupied by Sir Terence Conran's Bibendum restaurant (see http://ind.pn/cp4zaD)

Liverpool squad depth a major issue says John W Henry

Owner John Henry admits the depth of the Liverpool squad was one of his primary concerns when Fenway Sports Group bought the club last year.

Geek Nation: How Indian Science is Taking Over the World, By Angela Saini

The average Indian teenager of my time would have sold his grandmother (with her enthusiastic consent) for a place in the fabled Indian Institute of Technology or even a medical school – and then, more often than not, left for some worthy but intellectually undemanding job in the West. Make up your own list of Indians who have had a global impact and there will be few scientists on it. Indian artists, writers and social scientists have achieved vastly more, and for a fraction of the state investment that has gone into science and technology. Has Indian science ever produced a Ravi Shankar or, for that matter, a Raj Kapoor?

Microsoft takes Google complaint to Europe

Following a decade of battles with the European Commission, Microsoft has surprised the market by calling on its old foe to rein in Google, claiming the search engine giant was engaging in anti-competitive practices.

Gates is a ruthless schemer, says his Microsoft co-founder

Bill Gates is a ruthless schemer who demeaned his employees and conspired to rip off his business partner, according to a memoir written by the co-founder of Microsoft, Paul Allen.

England have 50-over ability insists Jonathan Trott

England have a date with destiny against West Indies tomorrow - but win or lose in their crunch World Cup match, Jonathan Trott is convinced they are capable of future limited-overs glories.

Battle of browsers heats up with IE9

As Microsoft launches the latest version of its web browser, Nick Clark looks at a market that is more competitive than ever

Business Diary: Blame Beale for Britain's woes

We know the Government and the BBC do not always see eye-to-eye, but this is getting bit silly – apparently, the corporation is to blame for the fact that Britain is short of the entrepreneurs it so badly needs. Research commissioned by the Small Business minister, Mark Prisk, reveals that Ian Beale – he's a rather unsavoury character in EastEnders in case you're not familiar with the soap opera – is the best-known small businessman on telly and that his negative image is giving entrepreneurs a bad name. More positive role models are needed to encourage people, Mr Prisk adds.

Fast-mover Kinect breaks record

The Microsoft Kinect has overtaken the iPhone and iPad to become the fastest selling consumer electronics device on record.

British Sea Power, Forum, London

The stage is filled with amps, microphones, musical instruments and trees. An old film is rolling in the background, the members of British Sea Power getting off a train, mumbling something indecipherable and walking off screen. Moments later, the Brighton six-piece emerge, utter a brief "hello" and launch straight into their set, their barrier-hugging acolytes' screams of excitement matching the band's first tracks decibel for decibel.

View from the ground at Microsoft’s Spring Showcase 2011

Microsoft’s line-up of Xbox 360, Kinect and Windows Mobile games

Our Private Life, Royal Court Theatre Upstairs, London

One of the hottest tickets in Theatreland at the moment is The Children's Hour with Keira Knightley, but Our Private Life, by Colombian author Pedro Miguel Rozo, knocks spots off Lillian Hellman's 1934 analysis of the destructive effects of false rumour. It has the wonderfully frisky, darkly droll elan of an early Almodóvar movie and shows how scandal can flush out discomfiting underlying truths.

Why men are the losers in economic revolution

After decades in which women have borne a disproportionate burden of unhappiness owing to a lack of opportunities outside the home, poor economic prospects and the pressures of running a family, the scales are about to be tipped in their favour. Men are the ones who face a "depressing future", researchers say.

Saints and Sinners, By Edna O'Brien

Still bidding her lyrical long goodbye
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Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness