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Suspect stabbed his friend to death after victim insisted prose was superior as literary genre

Imogen Cooper

Classical review: Imogen Cooper, Ivan Fischer, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Royal Festival Hall, London

The cadenza in a classical concerto is a curious thing. Originally devised as a way of letting the soloist show off, it became a commentary on the work it adorned, as well as a holiday from it: the soloist could take you on a switchback journey before bringing you safely home. These days, with so many other opportunities for display, its bravura function has faded, so soloists often use it instead as a slot to puff their own wares – as Kennedy does when he injects jazz and Gypsy music into his Brahms.

Burgh outside the British Council headquarters in London

Sir John Burgh: Senior civil servant and leader of the British Council

‘His judgement was excellent,’ Shirley Williams said of him. ‘He rang true on everything’

Theatre review: Doktor Glas, Wyndham’s Theatre, London

Which walking wreck of a Wallander did you prefer on television? The surprisingly convincing Kenneth Branagh version of the wiped-out alcoholic detective, or the more obviously authentic Swedish original of Krister Henriksson?

Glenda Jackson MP speaking during a tribute to Baroness Margaret Thatcher in the House of Commons, London.

And you thought your family politics were bad... what’s it like to be the child of a politician?

It can inspire you to follow in your parents’ footsteps – or embarrass you to death, discovers Simon Usborne

Matthew Norman on Monday: Introducing Maggie - the consensual PM

Francis Maude gave a contender for the Most Balanced Thatcher eulogy this weekend. Plus, why Lady T was an (almost) total supporter of democracy

Hamish McRae: Banks' misdeeds allow us to scrap our old bangers

One of the puzzles of the past year is how British consumers have managed to keep increasing their spending despite the continuing squeeze on their incomes and without further running down savings – rather the reverse.

Cool hand: Ryan Gosling as the heroic, big-hearted bank-robber in The Place Beyond the Pines

Jonathan Romney on The Place Beyond the Pines: A motorcycle bandit who runs out of gas

Ryan Gosling is a laconic outlaw riding through an epic, dirty America ... but he's no Brando

DVD: Seven Psychopaths

When it came out at the cinema, Martin McDonagh's postmodern crime comedy alienated those In Bruges fans who were hoping for a straightforward retread of his beloved debut film.

The Village: Grace (MAXINE PEAKE), John (JOHN SIMM), Young Bert (BILL JONES), Joe (NICO MIRALLEGRO)

New BBC show ‘The Village’ is okay, but too much bad rural-set TV has put our brains out to pasture

We are living through fascinating times, so why do we prefer fairy-tales of good and evil to honest thought-provoking drama?

George Washington in Bioshock

Review: Bioshock Infinite

The marketing behind Bioshock Infinite would have you believe it's a First Person Shooter. And yes, you can kill lots of people in quite horrid ways. A lot of these ways involve guns. But I can’t help thinking, more and more, that this isn’t simply another “machine gun” game.

Health officials carry sacks of culled chickens after bird flu was found at a farm in Agartala, India

A tough decision for Sunderland fans as Paolo Di Canio is appointed manager

David Miliband has made his position clear by stepping down - but will fans back the new manager despite his private beliefs?

In focus: Former winner Ballabriggs

All eyes on Aintree with racing's reputation on the line

As far as this year's Grand National is concerned, it will matter less who wins or loses, than how the game is played out. The deaths of high-profile contenders Synchronised and According To Pete in the race 12 months ago caught the attention of a world wider than racing's sometimes over-cosy family.

Protesters in London demand that Sir David Nicholson go

Sir David Nicholson: The man they couldn't hang

The decision to back the NHS chief is morally wrong, and has lost the coalition a rare opportunity to gain trust on health

Editorial: Put Abu Qatada on trial here

Taken in isolation, few would dispute that Britain would be better off without Abu Qatada. The radical preacher has a long history of association with, and fostering of, violent Islamism; indeed, he was described, by a Spanish judge, as “Osama bin Laden's right-hand man in Europe”. Yet the Home Secretary yesterday lost yet another attempt to deport him. And – problematic though the outcome may be – the ruling from the appeal court is still the right one.

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Greece debt crisis: What happened to democracy when it’s a case of 'Vote Yes or else'?

'The economic collapse has happened. What is at risk now is democracy...'

If it doesn’t work in Europe, how is it supposed to work in India or the Middle East, asks Robert Fisk
The science of swearing: What lies behind the use of four-letter words?

The science of swearing

What lies behind the use of four-letter words?
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won't have him back

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won’t have him back
Donna Karan is stepping down after 30 years - so who will fill the DKNY creator's boots?

Who will fill Donna Karan's boots?

The designer is stepping down as Chief Designer of DKNY after 30 years. Alexander Fury looks back at the career of 'America's Chanel'
10 best statement lightbulbs

10 best statement lightbulbs

Dare to bare with some out-of-the-ordinary illumination
Dustin Brown: Who is the tennis player who knocked Rafael Nadal out of Wimbeldon 2015?

Dustin Brown

Who is the German player that knocked Nadal out of Wimbeldon 2015?
Wimbledon 2015: Nick Bollettieri - It's time for big John Isner to produce the goods to go with his thumping serve

Nick Bollettieri's Wimbledon Files

It's time for big John Isner to produce the goods to go with his thumping serve
Tour de France 2015: Twins Simon and Adam Yates have a mountain to climb during Tour of duty

Twins have a mountain to climb during Tour of duty

Yates brothers will target the steepest sections in bid to win a stage in France
John Palmer: 'Goldfinger' of British crime was murdered, say police

Murder of the Brink’s-MAT mastermind

'Goldfinger' of British crime's life ended in a blaze of bullets, say police
Forget little green men - aliens will look like humans, says Cambridge University evolution expert

Forget little green men

Leading evolutionary biologist says aliens will look like humans
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: An Algerian scientist adjusts to life working in a kebab shop

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

An Algerian scientist struggles to adjust to her new life working in a Scottish kebab shop
Bodyworlds museum: Dr Gunther von Hagens has battled legal threats, Parkinson's disease, and the threat of bankruptcy

Dying dream of Doctor Death

Dr Gunther von Hagens has battled legal threats, Parkinson's disease, and the threat of bankruptcy
UK heatwave: Temperature reaches 39.8 degrees on Central Line - the sweatiest place in London

39.8 degrees recorded on Tube

There's hot (London) and too damn hot (the Underground). Simon Usborne braved the Central line to discover what its passengers suffer
Kitchens go hi-tech: From robot chefs to recipe-shopping apps, computerised cooking is coming

Computerised cooking is coming

From apps that automatically make shopping lists from your recipe books to smart ovens and robot chefs, Kevin Maney rounds up innovations to make your mouth water
Jessie Cave interview: The Harry Potter star has published a feminist collection of cartoons

Jessie Cave's feminist cartoons

The Harry Potter star tells Alice Jones how a one-night stand changed her life