News

Suspect stabbed his friend to death after victim insisted prose was superior as literary genre

Imogen Cooper

Classical review: Imogen Cooper, Ivan Fischer, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Royal Festival Hall, London

The cadenza in a classical concerto is a curious thing. Originally devised as a way of letting the soloist show off, it became a commentary on the work it adorned, as well as a holiday from it: the soloist could take you on a switchback journey before bringing you safely home. These days, with so many other opportunities for display, its bravura function has faded, so soloists often use it instead as a slot to puff their own wares – as Kennedy does when he injects jazz and Gypsy music into his Brahms.

Burgh outside the British Council headquarters in London

Sir John Burgh: Senior civil servant and leader of the British Council

‘His judgement was excellent,’ Shirley Williams said of him. ‘He rang true on everything’

Theatre review: Doktor Glas, Wyndham’s Theatre, London

Which walking wreck of a Wallander did you prefer on television? The surprisingly convincing Kenneth Branagh version of the wiped-out alcoholic detective, or the more obviously authentic Swedish original of Krister Henriksson?

Glenda Jackson MP speaking during a tribute to Baroness Margaret Thatcher in the House of Commons, London.

And you thought your family politics were bad... what’s it like to be the child of a politician?

It can inspire you to follow in your parents’ footsteps – or embarrass you to death, discovers Simon Usborne

Matthew Norman on Monday: Introducing Maggie - the consensual PM

Francis Maude gave a contender for the Most Balanced Thatcher eulogy this weekend. Plus, why Lady T was an (almost) total supporter of democracy

Hamish McRae: Banks' misdeeds allow us to scrap our old bangers

One of the puzzles of the past year is how British consumers have managed to keep increasing their spending despite the continuing squeeze on their incomes and without further running down savings – rather the reverse.

Cool hand: Ryan Gosling as the heroic, big-hearted bank-robber in The Place Beyond the Pines

Jonathan Romney on The Place Beyond the Pines: A motorcycle bandit who runs out of gas

Ryan Gosling is a laconic outlaw riding through an epic, dirty America ... but he's no Brando

DVD: Seven Psychopaths

When it came out at the cinema, Martin McDonagh's postmodern crime comedy alienated those In Bruges fans who were hoping for a straightforward retread of his beloved debut film.

The Village: Grace (MAXINE PEAKE), John (JOHN SIMM), Young Bert (BILL JONES), Joe (NICO MIRALLEGRO)

New BBC show ‘The Village’ is okay, but too much bad rural-set TV has put our brains out to pasture

We are living through fascinating times, so why do we prefer fairy-tales of good and evil to honest thought-provoking drama?

George Washington in Bioshock

Review: Bioshock Infinite

The marketing behind Bioshock Infinite would have you believe it's a First Person Shooter. And yes, you can kill lots of people in quite horrid ways. A lot of these ways involve guns. But I can’t help thinking, more and more, that this isn’t simply another “machine gun” game.

Health officials carry sacks of culled chickens after bird flu was found at a farm in Agartala, India

A tough decision for Sunderland fans as Paolo Di Canio is appointed manager

David Miliband has made his position clear by stepping down - but will fans back the new manager despite his private beliefs?

In focus: Former winner Ballabriggs

All eyes on Aintree with racing's reputation on the line

As far as this year's Grand National is concerned, it will matter less who wins or loses, than how the game is played out. The deaths of high-profile contenders Synchronised and According To Pete in the race 12 months ago caught the attention of a world wider than racing's sometimes over-cosy family.

Protesters in London demand that Sir David Nicholson go

Sir David Nicholson: The man they couldn't hang

The decision to back the NHS chief is morally wrong, and has lost the coalition a rare opportunity to gain trust on health

Editorial: Put Abu Qatada on trial here

Taken in isolation, few would dispute that Britain would be better off without Abu Qatada. The radical preacher has a long history of association with, and fostering of, violent Islamism; indeed, he was described, by a Spanish judge, as “Osama bin Laden's right-hand man in Europe”. Yet the Home Secretary yesterday lost yet another attempt to deport him. And – problematic though the outcome may be – the ruling from the appeal court is still the right one.

Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Turkey's conflict with Kurdish guerrillas in Iraq can benefit Isis in Syria

Turkey's conflict with Kurdish guerrillas in Iraq can benefit Isis in Syria

Turkish President Erdogan could benefit politically from the targeting of the PKK, says Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: Our choice is years of Tory rule under Jeremy Corbyn or a return to a Labour government

Our choice is years of Tory rule under Corbyn or a return to a Labour government

Yvette Cooper urged Labour members to 'get serious' about the next general election rather than become 'a protest movement'
Singapore's domestic workers routinely exploited and often abused in the service of rich nationals

Singapore's hidden secret of domestic worker abuse

David Cameron was shown the country's shiniest veneer on his tour. What he didn't see was the army of foreign women who are routinely exploited and often abused in the service of rich nationals
Showdown by Shirley Jackson: A previously unpublished short story from the queen of American Gothic

Showdown, by Shirley Jackson

A previously unpublished short story from the queen of American Gothic
10 best DSLRs

Be sharp! 10 best DSLRs

Up your photography game with a versatile, powerful machine
Solved after 200 years: the mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army

Solved after 200 years

The mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army
Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise

Robert Fisk on the Turkey conflict

Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise
Investigation into wreck of unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden

Sunken sub

Investigation underway into wreck of an unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden
Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes

Age of the selfie

Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes
Not so square: How BBC's Bloomsbury saga is sexing up the period drama

Not so square

How Virginia Woolf saga is sexing up the BBC period drama
Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

Still carrying the torch

The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

...but history suggests otherwise
The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

The bald truth

How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

Tour de France 2015

Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

A new beginning for supersonic flight?

Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash