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Morecambe Bay

The real Upstairs Downstairs

As the lavish period drama, now set in the 1930s, returns to TV, Andrew McCorkell offers a guide to the series, recalls its predecessor and speaks to modern-day lords, ladies and butlers

Move: Choreographing You, Hayward Gallery, London

Wear comfortable clothes and flat shoes to visit Move: Choreographing You at the Hayward, because to experience this exhibition properly, you will be swinging, crawling and balancing your way through the galleries. This vast show takes into account dance and contemporary art since the 1960s, and it's based on the premise that you, the visitor, are the dancer, and that the objects in the space manipulate your movement somehow. So you will find yourself squeezing sideways down Bruce Nauman's very narrow Green Light Corridor, feeling trapped and anxious, or stumbling in the dark through Lygia Clark's The House Is the Body. Penetration, ovulation, germination, expulsion, which creates a kind of brilliantly barmy sense of inhabiting a woman's body and then being born out of a woolly chamber. You can swing across the gallery (no easy task) on a series of gym rings by William Forsythe and goose-step over buckets of water in Trisha Brown's Stream on the outdoor sculpture terrace. A couple of Robert Morris's brilliant Bodyspacemotionthings, sculptures for balancing on, are here, subversive in the sense that they always feel rather dangerous.