Voices Former concentration camp prisoners attend a ceremony at the memorial site of the former Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland, on Holocaust Day, January 27, 2014. The ceremony took place 69 years after the liberation of the death camp by Soviet troops, in rememberance of the victims of the Holocaust.

As we approach a time when there will be no more survivors, focus is intensifying on recording their stories and learning the lessons of then – for now

Sophie Morris: Lessons we can learn from abroad

I found much to love about Icelandic society during a visit to Reykjavik last week, which was unexpected given that the country is practically bankrupt and in the throes of revolution, albeit a fairly tame one. But I stumbled upon an open and optimistic society, apparently untrammelled by the class mores which overly trouble so many English people. They are in good health, walk clean, safe streets and are incredibly attentive to the importance of family.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: The members for immunity

Damian Green is enjoying the moment. Can't blame him really. Must be like winning the lottery. His was a modest political career, plodding along. Then suddenly the genial MP became an accidental hero, his name emblazoned in lights of indignation.

Ian Burrell: Strictly scandalous – Beeb short-changes viewers again

"What is the point in having a public phone-in if the popular ones get pressured off anyway? They may as well just let the judges decide," commented contributor DgembaDgemba on the website Digital Spy yesterday after John Sergeant's abrupt departure from BBC1's Strictly Come Dancing.

The Feral Beast: What happened to name and shame?

Uh oh – gremlins at work at 'The Guardian'. Hugh Muir's diary last week referred to a certain "Mahatma Ghandi", only for the Corrections and Clarifications column to correct the mistake a few days later (it's Gandhi). All well and good. Except that on the previous page of that day's paper, Dame Polly Toynbee, of all people, was calling him "Ghandi" again. This led to another correction the following day, but curiously on this occasion the precise whereabouts of the mis-spelling was left rather vague, as "elsewhere in the paper". Poor Hugh – why didn't they spare his blushes too?

Janet Street-Porter: Lessons in life are important too

It would be easy (and snobbish) to sneer at the latest batch of diploma subjects for secondary school students announced by the Government this week, which includes hair and beauty and hospitality. Seminars in how to deal with difficult customers and lessons in all the different ways of styling hair may not seem the kind of text-book based stuff previous generations focused on, but these are practical skills which will ensure a job, and, hopefully reconnect a group of hard-to-reach young people to the learning process in a way they can relate to.

Pandora: Servants of the people

While others around you lose their heads, what's the answer to 12 across? That was the question bugging fun-loving environment minister Phil Woolas, when a Pandora mole walked in to his office last week.

With all the swirling rings in the universe, it’s still BBC News

The latest redesign of the corporation’s famous globe is more than just a rebranding exercise. But Raymond Snoddy asks what, if anything, the new look will achieve

BBC Mark II: Mr Byford gives the corporation's journalism a makeover

After unprecedented cuts in the BBC's newsrooms, Mark Byford is overseeing a critical rebranding of the corporation's journalism. He tells Ian Burrell of his pride at running the biggest current affairs operation on earth – and answers his critics

Kaplinsky: 'I'm not worth my wages'

Natasha Kaplinsky has embarrassed television bosses by questioning whether she is worth the "astonishing" and "ridiculous" amount of money she earns as a newsreader.

Interview: Dermot Murnaghan's on a Sky high

The man who braved the wrath of Peter Mandelson in an interview that led to the former Cabinet minister's resignation says he did not 'defect' from the BBC for more money. He tells Ian Burrell of his excitement at switching to Sky News

BBC staff rewrote Wikipedia pages to water down criticism

BBC officials repeatedly altered the Wikipedia internet encyclopaedia to water down attacks on the corporation, The Independent on Sunday can disclose.

'It has always been about my sanity'

...says Norwich-dwelling, vegetarian Trisha on her move to Five. Ciar Byrne listens

BBC to sell ballroom dancing hit worldwide

Strictly Come Dancing, the Saturday night television hit that made ballroom dancing unexpectedly cool, is to become one of the BBC's biggest money-spinning exports.

Arts and Entertainment
Sydney and Melbourne are locked in a row over giant milk crates
art
News
Kenny Ireland, pictured in 2010.
peopleActor, from House of Cards and Benidorm, was 68
News
A scene from the video shows students mock rioting
newsEnd-of-year leaver's YouTube film features staging of a playground gun massacre
Travel
travel
Voices
A family sit and enjoy a quiet train journey
voicesForcing us to overhear dull phone conversations is an offensive act, says Simon Kelner
News
i100This Instagram photo does not prove Russian army is in Ukraine
News
Morrissey pictured in 2013
people
Sport
sportVan Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Environment
View from the Llanberis Track to the mountain lake Llyn
Du’r Arddu
environmentA large chunk of Mount Snowdon, in north Wales, is up for sale
Life and Style
Martha Stewart wrote an opinion column for Time magazine this week titled “Why I Love My Drone”
lifeLifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot... to take photos of her farm
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices