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A man with a bloodied knife flees moments after a reveller is stabbed at the Notting Hill Carnival.

The Intelligent Consumer: A lounge-wear wizard does the business

People in fashion; Fashion designers deal in ideas not balance sheets, don't they? Imogen Fox meets the exception who proves the rule

Books: Bitter-sweet crumbs from the tuck box of love

The Essence of the Thing by Madeleine St John Fourth Estate, pounds 9.9 9 Emma Hagestadt is surprised to find a 'good read' has crept on to the Booker short list

Twin peeks at London's trendiest area

It Is a tale of two neighbourhoods. Last week the BBC World Service announced that it is to launch a twice-weekly soap opera, Westway, which will bring the events of a multi-cultural area of west London to a worldwide audience of 35 million listeners.

Property: Forget the price escalator. Find a place that rockets

There is nothing like spotting an up-and-coming area before it arrives. Early defensiveness turns to quiet triumphalism as rising prices prove your point. In London, a few areas have seen particularly startling increases. Penny Jackson reports on areas that are now in the Premier League

Carnival doesn't have to end today

At dusk tonight, the cacophony of tin whistles and calypso will fade to a murmur, marking the end of the 33rd Notting Hill Carnival. The steel drums will be packed up, the sound systems dismantled and the glittering costumes taken off to be mothballed.

Remaking the grade

Disappointing results can be challenged, but be prepared for more agony, writes Bethan Marshall

Law: A case for celebration

The Legal Action Group has achieved a lot in 25 years. But it still faces an uphill task. By Patricia Wynn Davies

Smith joins Labour's first estate

Baroness Smith, widow of the late Labour leader, opening a new street yesterday named after her husband.

'Crash' finds way round censor

The controversial film Crash will open in the West End of London despite being banned by Westminster City Council.

Letter: Happy town

White City has problems as you report: so do Avondale and Colville wards, the northern part of Notting Hill ("One motorway, two Britains", 11 May). In the late 1950s we had race riots here. Now local people, drawn from far more countries than you list, live side by side and get on with one another. Why not report these facts?

Strange how Alexander Fleming House has ceased to be a high-rise, concrete horror now that developers can make money from it

"A resistance worker who escaped from Nazi Germany just before the Second World War died when a fire raged through his studio house, an inquest heard today." I read this news story in a copy of last week's Camden New Journal. I was waiting for a deregulated London bus outside a forlorn housing estate and had picked the paper from a litter bin otherwise full of burger cartons. The death of 87-year-old Hans Aberbanell, "an antiquities expert", who worked underground with his wife from occupied Czechoslovakia helping fellow Jews to escape Hitler, did not make national news. By the end of his life, this man I do not know but like the sound of - "spirited and fascinating" according to neighbours - was frail and partially blind. He lived alone after the death of his wife. He felt the cold, and warmed his studio from the gas oven, the only source of heating, which he left on all-year round. It was the gas oven, more than a touch ironically, that did for him.

So what's so special about living in London W11?

The list of famous Notting Hill names goes on and on - just as the price of properties there goes up and up.

'Baddest boy in pop' jailed for stun-gun threat

'Baddest boy in pop' jailed for

Dawn of new blue period

Margaret Thatcher's suits and Tory party billboards have robbed the colour blue of its innocence, according to a group of artists who want to reclaim the colour from 18 years of Conservative appropriation.

Letter: A man's comment on a woman's conduct

After what Chris Blackhurst described as Nicola Horlick's extraordinary publicity-seeking performance, city personnel directors clearly face a problem. If, as he suggests, they can no longer appoint women, whatever are they to do? Men are presumably already ruled out (a long list of examples could start with Robert Maxwell). Maybe they'll just have to make do with people.
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Prices correct as of 21 November 2014
Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: Drifting and forgotten - turning lives around for ex-soldiers

Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: Turning lives around for ex-soldiers

Our partner charities help veterans on the brink – and get them back on their feet
Putin’s far-right ambition: Think-tank reveals how Russian President is wooing – and funding – populist parties across Europe to gain influence in the EU

Putin’s far-right ambition

Think-tank reveals how Russian President is wooing – and funding – populist parties across Europe to gain influence in the EU
Tove Jansson's Moominland: What was the inspiration for Finland's most famous family?

Escape to Moominland

What was the inspiration for Finland's most famous family?
Nightclubbing with Richard Young: The story behind his latest book of celebrity photographs

24-Hour party person

Photographer Richard Young has been snapping celebrities at play for 40 years. As his latest book is released, he reveals that it wasn’t all fun and games
Michelle Obama's school dinners: America’s children have a message for the First Lady

A taste for rebellion

US children have started an online protest against Michelle Obama’s drive for healthy school meals by posting photos of their lunches
Colouring books for adults: How the French are going crazy for Crayolas

Colouring books for adults

How the French are going crazy for Crayolas
Jack Thorne's play 'Hope': What would you do as a local politician faced with an impossible choice of cuts?

What would you do as a local politician faced with an impossible choice of cuts?

Playwright Jack Thorne's latest work 'Hope' poses the question to audiences
Ed Harcourt on Romeo Beckham and life as a court composer at Burberry

Call me Ed Mozart

Paloma Faith, Lana del Ray... Romeo Beckham. Ed Harcourt has proved that he can write for them all. But it took a personal crisis to turn him from indie star to writer-for-hire
10 best stocking fillers for foodies

Festive treats: 10 best stocking fillers for foodies

From boozy milk to wasabi, give the food-lover in your life some extra-special, unusual treats to wake up to on Christmas morning
Phil Hughes head injury: He had one weakness – it has come back to haunt him

Phil Hughes had one weakness – it has come back to haunt him

Prolific opener had world at his feet until Harmison and Flintoff bounced him
'I have an age of attraction that starts as low as four': How do you deal with a paedophile who has never committed a crime?

'I am a paedophile'

Is our approach to sex offenders helping to create more victims?
How bad do you have to be to lose a Home Office contract?

How bad do you have to be to lose a Home Office contract?

Serco given Yarl’s Wood immigration contract despite ‘vast failings’
Green Party on the march in Bristol: From a lost deposit to victory

From a lost deposit to victory

Green Party on the march in Bristol
Putting the grot right into Santa's grotto

Winter blunderlands

Putting the grot into grotto
'It just came to us, why not do it naked?' London's first nude free runner captured in breathtaking images across capital

'It just came to us, why not do it naked?'

London's first nude free runner captured in breathtaking images across capital