News The new series of 'The Voice' got underway last weekend

ITV makes complaint in its submission into the Culture Committee's inquiry into the future of the BBC

Navy tackles oil leak from battleship war grave

IT IS ONE of the Royal Navy's most sacred war graves. Torpedoed by a U-boat in 1939 with the loss of 833 lives, the battleship HMS Royal Oak lies beneath 90ft of water at the bottom of Scapa Flow in Orkney.

The 5,000-year-old mystery of a bump on the head

A FILM EDITOR is trying to find out whether a pronounced bump that gives his head the shape of a German soldier's coalscuttle helmet links him to a woman buried 5,000 years ago in a tomb in the Orkneys.

Obituary: Ralegh Radford

RALEGH RADFORD was the last of the prodigies of British archaeology from the 1930s and the years following the Second World War who, along with the like of Mortimer Wheeler, Christopher Hawkes and Gordon Childe, dictated the intellectual progress of the subject.

At last, an end to feudalism

The Highlands teem with foreign lairds, bristling with anger at the ingratitude of their serfs

Take the long way round to the Cook Islands

INFORMATION DESK: YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR PANEL OF EXPERTS

Christmas Gifts: Say it with hampers this Christmas

Sarah Jewell samples a variety of festive favourites sure to tickle your tastebuds

Getting on the map

The people of Orkney don't speak Gaelic (and never have), do have electricity and their eyebrows don't join in the middle. But could a mainlander tell you that?

Disunited kingdom

The British are at a turning point. After 300 years the union of England and Scotland may be heading for the rocks; if devolution leads to divorce, the effects - on both countries - will be profound. The Scots voted for their own parliament, with tax-raising powers, one year ago. But contrary to expectation, the desire for independence seems to have been stimulated rather than dulled - support for the Scottish National Party has been growing ever since. This week, it holds what could be the most important party conference of its history. If it wins a majority of seats in the new parliament, Scots may well find themselves on the road to full-blown independence. This week's issue of the Sunday Review asks: just what is going on north of the border, politically, culturally and economically?

Obituary: Sir Alastair Dunnett

ALASTAIR DUNNETT, the editor of The Scotsman from 1956 to 1972, was passionately committed to working in Scotland; on separate occasions he declined the offer of the editorship of the Fleet Street titles the Daily Herald and The Sunday Times.

FOOD AND DRINK: MORE THAN WHISKY GALORE

The Orkneys may be a real hike for dinner, but, says Michael Bateman, the islands' lobster, cheeses, lamb and whisky will excite even the most restrained of gourmets; DINNER DESTINATIONS; No2: THE CREEL, SOUTH RONALDSAY

Prince's Trust faces wall death charges

THE PRINCE'S Trust is to be prosecuted over the deaths of two young men following an accident on the Orkney islands last year.

MS more likely to strike those with Scottish genes

A SCOTTISH surname not only imparts the right to wear tartan, it significantly increases the risk of developing a severe neurological disorder, according to a study that links Celtic lineage to multiple sclerosis.

Divide and rule with the genre benders

Most artists find success by carving out a niche in one medium. Others won't be pigeonholed so easily. By Andrew G Marshall

Education: Learning for life, and life for learning

Children can get a lot out of community service, and a recent competition shows that they put a lot in, too.

Snow chaos in Scotland

Around 4,500 homes were still without power yesterday after snow and strong winds brought down power cables in Orkney, the Western Isles, Caithness and the Black Isle.
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No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor