Arts and Entertainment £8m: Charlotte Church's musical hiatus hasn't stopped her making the list

Former chart star Charlotte Church has been chosen to deliver an annual lecture to the radio industry in honour of late broadcaster John Peel.

Who guitarist brands Michael Moore a bully over song

Pete Townshend, the guitarist with The Who, says the documentary film maker Michael Moore is as bad a "bully" as George Bush, the man he vilifies in Fahrenheit 9/11.

Townshend released on police bail

Preview Pop: The Who

By far the most exciting live prospect in the run-up to Christmas is this pair of surprise gigs by one of the most full-blooded rock'n'roll bands ever - on their home turf in west London. The shows tie in with the release of Pete Townshend's Lifehouse box-set - the follow-up to Tommy, which has taken almost 30 years to see the light of day. It comes in the wake of a couple of Stateside concerts that have received ecstatic reviews. Over these two nights, the band will be playing most of their classics, and their aggressive, energetic and loud approach should transform an often-staid venue into a hot, sweaty rock joint. Joining original members Townshend, Daltrey and Entwistle will be Ringo Starr's son Zak Starkey on drums, and John "Rabbit" Bundrick on keyboards. The only down side is that Christmas will literally have come early for the ticket touts.

After the longest conception in rock history, the son of Tommy is born

A NEW chapter is about to be written in the history of rock. The Who's Pete Townshend has written the sequel to Tommy, the massively successful Sixties rock opera. It has taken him just under 30 years to write.

Sorry Pete, I didn't realise...

I FEAR I was one of those who failed to give the necessary inspiration to Pete Townshend when he embarked on his 28-year quest to compose Lifehouse.

Rock: The next generation

Sean (left, with John) and Julian Lennon: You can hear the four- year-old Sean gurgling on some versions of "With a Little Help from my Friends" as his dad thrashes an electric guitar. Nineteen years on, Sean is energetically pursuing a career in avant-garde pop, though reception has been muted. His half-brother, Julian, enjoyed chart success, though the excitement surrounding his early career was never matched by musical credibility.

Pop; Sleeve notes

In the past 12 months there seem to have been a lot of famous sons and daughters trying to make their way in the world of rock 'n' roll. One of the most successful was the emergence into the mainstream of Eliza Carthy, while Rufus Wainwright released an album that surely must have made his father proud. Then there were the John Lennon offspring, Sean and Julian, who both had albums out, Pete Townshend's daughter Emma fronting a band, Eva Rice leading the Replicant Saints and Rolan Bolan (above) doing a few gigs in Britain.

Pop: Still a kid, and he's alright

PETE TOWNSHEND AND FRIENDS

This comeback is deceased

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Who shone at Reading? A teenage shelf-stacker from Doncaster making his first falsetto attempt at karaoke, says Ryan Gilbey

Pop: Nanci Griffith / The Crickets Waterfront Hall, Belfast

It's become a staple of the modern star's career that he, she or they will, once impregnably established on their own merits, start working backwards to the songs and to the people themselves that inspired them in the first place. Most artists are happy enough to appear on tribute albums to their faded heroes, but Nanci Griffith is going the whole hog, turning her very career into a living memorial to Texas icons from Townes Van Zandt to Buddy Holly, old pals from school and pretty much anyone she used to listen to on the radio.
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