Arts and Entertainment £8m: Charlotte Church's musical hiatus hasn't stopped her making the list

Former chart star Charlotte Church has been chosen to deliver an annual lecture to the radio industry in honour of late broadcaster John Peel.

IF YOU CAN'T JOIN 'EM

Not everyone wants to sign on with the Roadshow. So what other career paths are open to the ageing rocker?

ROCK / The what, where, when and how good: Ben Thompson listens to a new boxed set of The Who, and talks to Roger Daltrey

'WHEN I got close up to him, I could see he was wearing my true face . . . the face I always wanted.' This, according to The Who's scrupulous biographer, Dave Marsh, is how hard-core fan 'Irish Jack' felt when he first saw Pete Townshend on stage at a Shepherd's Bush church hall in 1962. The epiphanous effect might seem to be undermined by Jack's qualifying statement - 'Everything would have been perfect if I had a nose like this geezer' - but it actually isn't. It was The Who's very distance from picture-book pop- star ideals that would make them so important to people.

ROCK / Not even star of his own band

THE TITLE of Bryan Adams' compilation album, So Far So Good, says a lot. Despite spending almost a third of 1991 at No 1 with '(Everything I Do) I Do it for You', Adams is still pretending a wheel could fall off any minute. His appearance at Wembley Arena was all about this strange contrast between phenomenal record sales and self-effacing blokedom.

Baba don't preach: Meher Baba came 'not to teach but to awaken'. A century later Dominic Cavendish finds his message of love is still being taken seriously

Tomorrow is the 100th anniversary of the birth, in Poona, India, of Meher Baba. To many people, this will mean nothing at all. Yet over the next few days several hundred devotees from around the country will gather to celebrate the life of the man who claimed he was the Avatar, or Christ, of his age.

THEATRE / Neil Bartlett 1, Pete Townshend 0: Night After Night - Royal Court; Iron Man - Young Vic; The Clearing - Bush

IN Night After Night, Neil Bartlett faces the musical. Together with Nicolas Bloomfield, the actor, producer and director has concocted an evening with 17 numbers, an on-stage band, a six-man chorus and, for the leading lady, more costume changes than Diana Ross made in the whole of the 1970s. But this is by no means your straight West End show: Cats-lovers may find themselves rubbed up the wrong way. Night After Night tips out the form's conventions on to the stage, shines a bright light in their eyes and watches them flinch.

THEATRE / Tales from the junkyard: Paul Taylor and Edward Seckerson double-take on Pete Townshend's The Iron Man

So eat your heart out Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Tin Man and every other clump of animated hardware that has starred in a children's musical. The Iron Man would have you all for breakfast, and I mean that quite literally. 'I eat heavy metal / I chew limousines,' sings the cannibalistic junkyard giant in Pete Townshend's new 'rock opera' version of Ted Hughes's popular fairytales. In the more banally worthy patches of this earnestly right-on show, I found myself fantasising sick confrontations for our hero (the Iron Man discovered snacking off the hubcabs of 'Genevieve', say), anything rather than see him converted into an icon of ecological soundness by a bunch of self-righteous kids.

ROCK / Pete and Ted's excellent adventure: Pete Townshend, a milder, older Pete Townshend, has been working on a children's rock musical with the poet laureate Ted Hughes. Kevin Jackson reports

An American songwriter of Pete Townshend's generation once counselled his fans never to create anything, because creations have the nasty habit of staying with you and plaguing you for the rest of your life. One of the creations that has dogged the former leader of The Who is a line yawped by Roger Daltrey in 'My Generation', devoutly wishing the consummation of a young death.

He's got the whole world in his laptop: Interview: Pete Townshend invented Virtual Reality (maybe) and he still thinks there's life in the concept album. By Andy Gill

PETE TOWNSHEND is a busy man these days. In August he's off to the United States to work on a stage version of Iron Man, his musical setting of Ted Hughes's poem; the stage version of Tommy is a big hit on Broadway, has won five Tony awards and looks set to tour; another Who tour is looming on the horizon; and this week his latest solo project, a radio-play-with-music called Psychoderelict, is released, though Townshend won't be here to mark the fact. He's off on a low-key promotional tour of small American theatres. Busy, busy.

Musical harmonies disrupted by miner's 'revolutionary theory': Tim Kelsey reports on an attempt to convince musicologists about a new form of notation

IN THE music room, Duncan Thorburn has two guitars, an upright piano, and several huge scrolls of paper on which he has plotted his compositions.

ROCK & JAZZ / That's why the lady sings the dues

'NOT ONLY is this guy a great musician with an incredible voice, he also invented penicillin, rode the winner of the 1982 Kentucky Derby, and saved Eudora, my highland terrier, from certain death in a horrendous tumble-drier accident.' Nanci Griffith's introductions of her guests and accompanists at the Royal Albert Hall are a little on the fulsome side, given their contributions. Tanita Tikaram, for one, gets about three big, gruff notes in 'It's Too Late' before she's off back to her dressing-room, looking rather embarrassed.
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