Arts and Entertainment Sandra Bullock and George Clooney in Alfonso Cuaron's Gravity.

A decade after collaborating on Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban (2003), Mexican director Alfonso Cuaron and British producer David Heyman have combined forces again on Gravity, a 3D survival thriller set in deepest, darkest space. The new film (which opens the Venice Film Festival) is a visual triumph even if its storytelling is less than sure-footed.

The new Rose blooms at last

Marlowe and Shakespeare's original Elizabethan playhouse has been given a hi-tech restoration.

Dame Judi picks Rose that grew on her

A FULL-SIZE replica of the Rose Theatre made for the hit film Shakespeare in Love has been acquired by Dame Judi Dench as a souvenir.

I Liked It So Much I Bought The Company

Peter Wheeler: In 1981 Mr Wheeler was a chemical engineer who owned a TVR, an exclusive high-powered British sports car. That year he became the struggling company's saviour when he bought it. His instincts have been successful and the company is in profit. Sales this year will be 2,000, compared with 170 the year he took over. There is a two-year waiting list for the latest model.

Sticking the knife in

Standing in a spectacular Shakespearian theatre, the words "time- warp" spring to mind. The elevated seats are empty, but below on stage, a vicious duel is being played out by two men with a range of theatrical swords and daggers.

Once bitten, twice shy, third time lucky...

The loo roll may be soft and strong, but it's the making of the advert that is very, very long. At least when the star is a pup. Louise Jury sniffs out the action.

Connery falls victim to road vandals

Sean Connery was recovering yesterday in his central-London home after a brick was hurled from a road bridge, smashing the front window of his Range Rover while he was driving and leaving him deeply shocked but not seriously hurt. The noise was so loud the actor thought it was a gun firing, his younger brother Neil Connery said yesterday.

Where the camera lies

Sophie Campbell looks between the frames of `Evita' for the real Argentina. Or is that Hungary?

Arts: THE FILM'S THE THING

Kenneth Branagh's four-hour `Hamlet' has a cast-list that reads like a roll-call on Oscar night. It's already a hit in the States - but 11 months ago, up to his ankles in fake snow, the star and director was wondering how the hell he ever got himself into this ...

Come on, do the locomotive

Britain's favourite steam engine is on a non-stop route to the Stock Exchange, writes Paul Rodgers; profile; Thomas the Tank Engine

Based on an original idea by William Shakespeare

Where once only Olivier dared to tread, now the big guns are lining up to make big movies from the Shakespearian canon. And they're doing surprisingly big box office. Coming soon to a cinema near you: McKellen's `Richard III', Branagh's `Hamlet', Nunn's `Twelfth Night' and Noble's `A Midsummer Night's Dream'

On location in Britain and Ireland

Superman IV in Milton Keynes? Carry on up the Khyber on Mount Snowdon? Liese Spencer presents a shot-by-shot guide to the towns and castles used as backdrops for some classic films

From Lilliput to Brobdingnag, via Soho: Gulliver's new travels

Ivan Waterman hears how hi-tech solved the problem of adapting Swift's classic for television

Scott of the Atlantic

Tony Scott pulled a few strokes to film the submarine thriller Crimson Tide. It's how he's stayed afloat in mainstream Hollywood. By Chris Peachment

Penny-share ticket to the movies

Investment in Metrodome demonstrates revived interest in UK films, writes Richard Phillips

Market Report: Suspicion of a counter-bid fuels Lasmo performance

THE suspicion that a counter-bidder is preparing to barge into the battle for control of the Lasmo oil group is enthralling the market.
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Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?