Voices

On a per capita basis, the nation has all the ingredients to be one of the world's most prosperous nations

Leading article: Lost and found

A certain romance attaches to a lost work of art. All the more so when it is recovered. Such is the case with a translation of the Aeneid by CS Lewis, which has come to light long after scholars assumed it had perished in a bonfire of Lewis's notebooks after his death in 1963.

Jan Gossaert's Renaissance at The National Gallery

Jan Gossaert is hardly a household name. However, the Old Master, known in his early 16th Century heyday as Jan Mabuse, is widely credited with changing the course of Flemish art, taking the tradition of Jan van Eyck and melding it with Italianate techniques.

Mona Lisa model 'was male lover'

A male apprentice, longtime companion and possibly lover of Leonardo da Vinci was the main influence and a model for the Mona Lisa, an Italian researcher claims.

James Tyler: Lutenist who helped lead the early-music revival of the 1960s

The 1960s was the decade when the early music group came of age, with historically authentic ensembles such as New York Pro Musica, Studio der Frühen Musik (Munich), and David Munrow's Early Music Consort of London reaching new levels of technical and musical excellence on period instruments. The lutenist James Tyler was a member of all three groups, during the early part of a career that was devoted to the historically accurate performance of music for plucked strings. His death has robbed the early music world of one of the finest, most knowledgeable, and most likeable exponents of those instruments.

Cross Purposes: Shock and Contemplation in Images of the Crucifixion, Ben Uri Gallery, London

Can there be any motif more common in the Western canon than the crucifixion of Jesus Christ? And yet when we come to consider the painted images of Christ on the cross that we best remember, we think of the Italian Renaissance, of Masaccio, Raphael, Michelangelo and others. And perhaps of the 17th century too – Zurbaran, for example. After that, we begin to falter. This important exhibition at the London Jewish Museum of Art invites us to consider how the idea of the crucifixion was seized upon by painters of the 20th century, and whether its meaning changed because of the history of that century. Just as importantly, it examines the meaning that the crucifixion came to have for Jewish painters, such as Marc Chagall.

Great Works: The Flaying of Marsyas (c.1575 ), Titian

Archbishop's Palace, Kromeriz

Canaletto and his Rivals, National Gallery, London

Why these stiff, theatrical views spawned so many imitators is a question unanswered

Studies in the History of the Renaissance, By Walter Pater

If he is remembered at all, Pater is known for his influence on Oscar Wilde. In his introduction to this "incendiary" text of 1873, Matthew Beaumont describes it as being seen in the "bourgeois imagination" as "the literary equivalent of Zuleika Dobson".

Close Examination: Fakes, Mistakes & Discoveries, National Gallery, London

An engaging show muddies the moral waters with fakery

Fakes and mistakes on show at National Gallery

The secrets behind some of the world's most popular paintings are being explored in a new exhibition at the National Gallery.

Album: Biber/Sances/Legrenzi etc, Via Crucis (Virgin Classics)

Christina Pluhar and L'Arpeggiata join forces with Corsican vocal ensemble Barbara Furtuna and assorted soloists for a fascinating programme of motets and meditations on the Passion.

Beauty and Power: The Peter Marino Collection, Wallace Collection, London

This tiny exhibition may lack the Renaissance A-listers, but it spans the short, unsteady step to the Baroque with convincing panache

Final Demands, By Frederic Raphael

So we come to the end of the glittering prize-giving. Frederic Raphael's waspish hero has gone from 17 to 70 as the trilogy which began with The Glittering Prizes comes to its sparkling end. There is no Cambridge equivalent of Oxford's Brideshead Revisited. Perhaps we didn't have enough lords. Like My Friend Judas, Andrew Sinclair's roman à clef also set on the banks of the Cam, The Glittering Prizes was our downmarket equivalent to what a Raphael character refers to as "Weeviling Waugh".

Collection of manuscripts expected to fetch £16 million

An "outstanding" collection of illuminated manuscripts previously owned by kings, bishops and the aristocracy is expected to fetch up to £16 million when it goes under the hammer.

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