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Robert F. Kennedy

Philippe Parreno, Serpentine Gallery, London

Time, for Philippe Parreno, is of the essence. The Algerian-born artist, who rose to prominence in the 1990s as part of a group of artists with a preference for collaboration and artistic deconstruction, has treated his first major UK exhibition, at the Serpentine Gallery, more like an event than a gallery show. Though the exhibition comprises mainly film works, one can't wander around and stop for a few minutes watching films as you please. The experience is carefully choreographed at around 25 minutes: only one film is on at any one time, and you are led towards it by window blinds that automatically lower and lift, and the coaxing sounds of speakers that beckon you, spellbound, in the right direction.

The Diary: Venice Film Festival; Jonathan Lee; Tony Blair; Bob Geldof;

First impressions of Venice as the film festival kicks off: it's under radical reconstruction. Alighting from my vaporetto at the Lido, I was greeted by lots of fenced off bits and pieces, depressingly reminiscent of inner-city London roadworks. Go further inland and the Palazzo del Cinema is under construction while the historic Hotel des Bains is being converted into apartments (to the horror of upmarket Venice veterans). Still, at least the Excelsior Hotel is still standing. Aside from the off-putting construction works, another "trend" is already making itself felt in Venice this year – yet another visual artist has turned his hand to film. Isaac Julien will screen his Better Life at the festival. Inspired by a combination of contemporary Shanghai, Chinese fable and the 2004 Morecambe Bay tragedy in which 23 Chinese cockle-pickers died, it stars Maggie Cheung (above left). Julien, a former YBA and Turner Prize nominee, follows in the footsteps of artist colleagues including Sam Taylor-Wood, Steve McQueen and Julian Schnabel (whose film Miral also screens in Venice) who have all turned to film in recent years and have won film festival plaudits and prizes for their efforts.

The Timeline: Political siblings

Fraternal amity is not a condition necessarily associated with the Roman Empire in its latter days, though the Gracchus brothers do seem to have held each other in high regard. Both tribunes of the Republic and both possessed of "eloquence sufficient to make the less creditable plausible", as Plutarch has it, their campaign on behalf of Rome's down-trodden alienated the senatorial elite and led to their end. Tiberius was slain with a foot stool by a Senator with a gripe. His brother Gaius committed suicide on the point of his personal slave's sword.

James Lawton: Pacquiao can take final step towards clinching the most

It's rarely a hardship watching Brazilians play, wherever they cast up in their relentless globe-trotting. However, there has to be the suspicion as the sun rises here this morning, that whatever the world's greatest football nation produces tonight against Fabio Capello's England in the Khalifa Stadium, one might just be in the wrong desert.

RFK Must Die: the Assassination of Bobby Kennedy (NC)

It's 40 years next month since Bobby Kennedy was murdered at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles by a young Palestinian-American gunman, Sirhan Sirhan – or was he? O'Sullivan's film, which started life as a report for Newsnight, sets out to show that things weren't that simple.

Jagger vs Lennon: London's riots of 1968 provided the backdrop to a

Forty years ago, the world was on the brink of revolution. But while Mick was urging insurrection on the streets of London, John was preaching peace and love. In a series of incendiary, rediscovered interviews, Jagger and Lennon reveal themselves as never before or since: battling one another for the soul of rock'n'roll