Arts and Entertainment

One minute he was a humble punter trying to peek up Debbie Harry's skirt at a Hammersmith Odeon gig, the next he was the owner of the venue which was to steal the Odeon's crown. If Simon Parkes' autobiography – full of raucous tales and Geezer-speak – is ever made into a film, it will be fun trying to find an actor who can do him justice. When he wants to sound hard, he can sometimes come across like Ray Winstone. But would Ray Winstone ever have banked at Coutts?

Red Riding Hood, Theatre Royal, Stratford East, London

Joan Littlewood's old venue, with its red Victorian interior and raucous local audience, is perfect for panto: and there's nowhere cosier to be at this time of year than inside the belly of the wolf, as Little Red and her forest friends soon discover.

The album covers that made it hip to be square

Richard Evans has designed albums for a huge range of musicians, from Abba's Agnetha to The Who. Here, he celebrates great sleeve art through the ages

Robert Plant, Roundhouse, London

Robert Plant looks as comfortable in his skin as a man can be. He has already skipped past his twin 2007 triumphs, the massively acclaimed hit album with Alison Krauss, Raising Sand, and Led Zeppelin's reunion show. His new album, Band of Joy, sensibly follows up neither, instead finding some of the rock spark missing from his work with Krauss. Playing with this Band of Joy, Plant includes four Zeppelin songs and revisits their wells of inspiration with urbane conviction.

Robert Plant and the Band of Joy, St David's Hall, Cardiff<br/>Fenech-Soler, Thekla, Bristol

Not as exciting as Led Zeppelin, but even at 62 this lion in dad's denim still knows how to work a crowd

Album: Robert Plant, Band of Joy (Decca)

How do you follow the multi-platinum selling, Grammy award-winning Raising Sand?

September Song: It's time to celebrate the Queen of Months

The summer's gone &ndash; and everything's suddenly coming back to life. Michael Bywater writes in praise of our most glorious time of year

Robert Plant and His Band of Joy, One Mayfair, London

The Grade I-listed One Mayfair was built in the early 19th century as St Mark's Church, to service the needs of an aristocratic clientele away from their country seats. Restored following its deconsecration in the Seventies, it makes the perfect venue for a secret gig by one of today's rock aristocracy, Robert Plant CBE, up in London from his Worcestershire home to launch his first album with his new group Band of Joy.

Robert Plant: 'I feel so far away from heavy rock'

Ahead of the release of his new album, Band of Joy, Robert Plant talks to Andy Gill about the move from fronting the biggest band in the world to his success in exploring a diverse range of styles, from vocal harmony and country to North African and Arabic

Richie Hayward: Highly rated Little Feat drummer who also backed Bob Dylan and Robert Plant

A founder member of the American group Little Feat, Richie Hayward was a drummer's drummer, much admired by fans and fellow musicians for his playing ability and the way he drove this fine band, best known for "Willin", the trucker song written by their original leader, the singer and guitarist Lowell George.

Matthew Bell: The IoS Diary (23/05/10)

Always walking on sunshine

Gabriella Cilmi: Who's that girl?

Her 'Sweet About Me' was the most-played song in the UK in 2009. But now Gabriella Cilmi has ditched the bluesy image and reinvented herself as a sexy electro-pop siren. Gillian Orr finds out what's behind the transformation

Melody maker: T-Bone Burnett

The Texan musician and producer has dug out the best of Americana for a string of acclaimed movies. Now he's tipped for a Bafta &ndash; and an Oscar &ndash; for his most recent soundtrack

Outside the Box: Sir Stan's boots up for sale &ndash; but are they the sole pair?

How many pairs of boots did Stanley Matthews wear while giving the most famous performance of his career, in Blackpool's 4-3 win over Bolton in the 1953 FA Cup final? The question arises now that Bonhams are preparing to auction what they believe to be the actual footwear, despite the National Football Museum in Preston having a pair for which they make the same claim. The NFM say they were donated by someone in the Stoke area 18 months ago. But a Bonhams football specialist told Outside The Box it was most unlikely that a player in those days would have changed boots and that they are convinced they have the authentic pair, obtained from Matthews' great friend Wilf Coomer, who was given them in the dressing-room after the game. Any doubts about the provenance would reduce the price from the current estimate of £6,000 to £8,000. Also in the auction, in Chester on 24 February, is the second medal presented to Jose Mourinho for winning the Premier League, in 2005-06. Like the first, which was sold to a Chelsea fan for £21,600, the flamboyant manager threw it into the crowd.

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