Arts and Entertainment

The rock star turned interior designer Lenny Kravitz, who has designed chairs for Philippe Starck and creates rock-star interiors for private homes with his creative team, wants to expand his company Kravitz Design, into a Ralph Lauren-size empire, according to the New York Post.

Arts: With friends like these ...

In the disused St Pancras station hotel, the cast of the forthcoming film `Final Cut' gathers for what resembles, fittingly, the last supper. But in this British movie, all is not as it seems

New Films: Reviews

CAPTAIN JACK (PG, 100 mins)

The Sitter's Tale; Jude Law and Sadie Frost

New faces at the National Portrait Gallery: the star of 'eXistenZ' and his wife, an actress, celebrate their anniversary in the red room

Books: The Modern Library

On Iain Sinclair's

Film: Dark Blood: the vanishing of a Hollywood star

George Sluizer was the last man to direct River Phoenix before the actor's untimely death. He was also responsible for the creepiest thriller of the Eighties - the `disappearance' movie to end them all. Or so you'd think.

Review: Laugh? I nearly cried

Theatre: Dracula Hackney Empire, London

Preview: Exhibition: It came from out of the Fifties

Hammer Horror

Books: Fangs ain't what they used to be

One hundred years ago this month, Constable & Company first published Bram Stoker's Dracula. Though not an immediate hit, it was a steady seller throughout the rest of Stoker's life (he died the week the Titanic went down, in 1912) and has remained constantly in print. Dracula picked up popularity in the 1920s, adapted for the stage and plagiarised for the cinema by F W Murnau as Nosferatu; and the 1930s, when Bela Lugosi leered over his black cloak in the most famous Hollywood version. Subsequent generations, especially in the cinema, have reworked the character: courtesy of Christopher Lee, Frank Langella, Klaus Kinski, George Hamilton, Gary Oldman, the Count from Sesame Street ...

Hammer Horror, the long deceased master of gore is set to rise from the grave.

Hammer Horror films are celebrating the 40th anniversary of their first movie. And as a birthday present advertising mogul, Charles Saatchi, has signed a deal that will transform Hammer from a twitching cadaver into a global empire. Add to this the forthcoming bicentenary of the birth of Frankenstein's creator, Mary Shelley and the publishing centenary of Bram Stoker's Dracula - and we face one of the most horror-filled months of the century.

Dracula puts a bloody stamp on the mail

Nightmares will be dropping through the letterbox from Tuesday as the Royal Mail issues a set of stamps devoted to well-known tales of terror.

The human condition: Mama was a rolling stone ...

The rock'n'roll generation were also, embarrassingly, your parents... Suzi Feay on Saffy Syndrome survivors

Learning the art of public speaking (the hard way)

Real lives

FILM / Schlesinger's massacre of 'The Innocent'

JOHN SCHLESINGER'S version of Ian McEwan's The Innocent (15) is an oddly disjointed piece of film-making - and I don't think that's out of homage to the famous scene in the novel in which a man gets dismembered. There are good performances, a decent sense of place (both of 1950s Berlin and, in two framing scenes, of Berlin as the Wall fell) and moments of horror and macabre humour. But Schlesinger doesn't draw them together or impose a visual style. It's his fourth recent venture into espionage, and it's easy to see something of the spy in Schlesinger himself - not so much a betrayal of his talent, as a refusal to reveal himself, a cautious evasiveness.

FILM / Slaughter of The Innocent: Adam Mars-Jones on a spectacular miscasting in John Schlesinger's The Innocent, and the headline-raiding Shopping . . .

Anyone who is familiar with Ian McEwan's source novel will be wondering, after reading the cast list or seeing a poster for John Schlesinger's film version of The Innocent (15), what part there can be in it for Sir Anthony Hopkins. The answer is there isn't one, but there he is anyway. The choice of Hopkins to play the character of Bob Glass, the man in charge of a secret operation in Cold War Berlin, is one of the most spectacularly self-destructive pieces of star casting in the cinema. He has the same effect on The Innocent, a cinematic vehicle of moderate pulling power, as a horse lying in front of a milk-float. The fact that the beast is a thoroughbred and has won prizes really doesn't come into it.
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