Arts and Entertainment

The rock star turned interior designer Lenny Kravitz, who has designed chairs for Philippe Starck and creates rock-star interiors for private homes with his creative team, wants to expand his company Kravitz Design, into a Ralph Lauren-size empire, according to the New York Post.

Arts: With friends like these ...

In the disused St Pancras station hotel, the cast of the forthcoming film `Final Cut' gathers for what resembles, fittingly, the last supper. But in this British movie, all is not as it seems

New Films: Reviews

CAPTAIN JACK (PG, 100 mins)

The Sitter's Tale; Jude Law and Sadie Frost

New faces at the National Portrait Gallery: the star of 'eXistenZ' and his wife, an actress, celebrate their anniversary in the red room

Books: The Modern Library

On Iain Sinclair's

Film: Dark Blood: the vanishing of a Hollywood star

George Sluizer was the last man to direct River Phoenix before the actor's untimely death. He was also responsible for the creepiest thriller of the Eighties - the `disappearance' movie to end them all. Or so you'd think.

Review: Laugh? I nearly cried

Theatre: Dracula Hackney Empire, London

Preview: Exhibition: It came from out of the Fifties

Hammer Horror

Books: Fangs ain't what they used to be

One hundred years ago this month, Constable & Company first published Bram Stoker's Dracula. Though not an immediate hit, it was a steady seller throughout the rest of Stoker's life (he died the week the Titanic went down, in 1912) and has remained constantly in print. Dracula picked up popularity in the 1920s, adapted for the stage and plagiarised for the cinema by F W Murnau as Nosferatu; and the 1930s, when Bela Lugosi leered over his black cloak in the most famous Hollywood version. Subsequent generations, especially in the cinema, have reworked the character: courtesy of Christopher Lee, Frank Langella, Klaus Kinski, George Hamilton, Gary Oldman, the Count from Sesame Street ...

Hammer Horror, the long deceased master of gore is set to rise from the grave.

Hammer Horror films are celebrating the 40th anniversary of their first movie. And as a birthday present advertising mogul, Charles Saatchi, has signed a deal that will transform Hammer from a twitching cadaver into a global empire. Add to this the forthcoming bicentenary of the birth of Frankenstein's creator, Mary Shelley and the publishing centenary of Bram Stoker's Dracula - and we face one of the most horror-filled months of the century.

Dracula puts a bloody stamp on the mail

Nightmares will be dropping through the letterbox from Tuesday as the Royal Mail issues a set of stamps devoted to well-known tales of terror.

The human condition: Mama was a rolling stone ...

The rock'n'roll generation were also, embarrassingly, your parents... Suzi Feay on Saffy Syndrome survivors

Learning the art of public speaking (the hard way)

Real lives

FILM / Schlesinger's massacre of 'The Innocent'

JOHN SCHLESINGER'S version of Ian McEwan's The Innocent (15) is an oddly disjointed piece of film-making - and I don't think that's out of homage to the famous scene in the novel in which a man gets dismembered. There are good performances, a decent sense of place (both of 1950s Berlin and, in two framing scenes, of Berlin as the Wall fell) and moments of horror and macabre humour. But Schlesinger doesn't draw them together or impose a visual style. It's his fourth recent venture into espionage, and it's easy to see something of the spy in Schlesinger himself - not so much a betrayal of his talent, as a refusal to reveal himself, a cautious evasiveness.

FILM / Slaughter of The Innocent: Adam Mars-Jones on a spectacular miscasting in John Schlesinger's The Innocent, and the headline-raiding Shopping . . .

Anyone who is familiar with Ian McEwan's source novel will be wondering, after reading the cast list or seeing a poster for John Schlesinger's film version of The Innocent (15), what part there can be in it for Sir Anthony Hopkins. The answer is there isn't one, but there he is anyway. The choice of Hopkins to play the character of Bob Glass, the man in charge of a secret operation in Cold War Berlin, is one of the most spectacularly self-destructive pieces of star casting in the cinema. He has the same effect on The Innocent, a cinematic vehicle of moderate pulling power, as a horse lying in front of a milk-float. The fact that the beast is a thoroughbred and has won prizes really doesn't come into it.
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Netherlands' goalkeeper Tim Krul fails to make a save from Costa Rica's midfielder Celso Borges during a penalty shoot-out in the quarter-final between Netherlands and Costa Rica during the 2014 FIFA World Cup
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Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
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Chancellor George Osborne, along with the Prime Minister, have been 'complacently claiming the economy is now fixed', according to shadow Chancellor Ed Balls
i100... which is awkward, because he is their boss, after all
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Sydney and Melbourne are locked in a row over giant milk crates
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Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux play teeneage lovers in the French erotic drama 'Blue Is The Warmest Colour' - The survey found four times as many women admitting to same-sex experiences than 20 years ago
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Preparations begin for Edinburgh Festival 2014
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices