Arts and Entertainment

The rock star turned interior designer Lenny Kravitz, who has designed chairs for Philippe Starck and creates rock-star interiors for private homes with his creative team, wants to expand his company Kravitz Design, into a Ralph Lauren-size empire, according to the New York Post.

Travel: Transylvania for suckers: Carole Cadwalladr fancied a ghouls' night out in Brasov, but she missed the incubus and could find nothing to get her teeth into

I had read Bram Stoker's Dracula, and seen the film and, since I was passing through Transylvania, it seemed like a good idea to pick up the T-shirt. The taxi driver from Brasov station had got my number. 'I know why you come here,' he said, leering. 'You want to find Vlad to impale you.' Or maybe I just misheard.

TELEVISION / BRIEFING: Second helping of Garlic dread

A full six months after the release of Francis Ford Coppola's film, REAR WINDOW (9pm C4) gets round to biting into the subject of Dracula. Perhaps the theory is that if you wait long enough, anything will become trendy again. Dracula: The Undiscovered Country opens the coffin-lid of the myth that refuses to die. It is hard to criticise any programme that features numerous hammy Hammer clips of wooden actors in ludicrous costumes frowning, shaking their heads and saying things like 'abandon hope all ye whom he doth approach'. But the structure of Sue Clayton's documentary is a lot less sharp than the Count's teeth. It flits between footage of the Count in countless guises (check out the Finnish film with Lenin as a vampiric 'corpse without a cause') and lugubrious readings from vampire tales through the ages by Ronan Vibert. The odd moment is suitably incisive - like the 1930s film of Transylvanians floating loaves topped with candles downriver to appease the undead, or a clip from a Cold War paranoia movie featuring 'blood-sucking Commies from outer space'. But, all in all, Dracula: The Undiscovered Country seems unlikely to send you to bed clutching the crucifix and garlic.

Health: Blood-lust in the clinic: Pure fiction? Psychiatrists know better. Raj Persaud unearths some facts about the living, the dead and the undead

LIKE a bat out of hell, vampire-mania has hit town with the opening of Francis Ford Coppola's blockbuster, Bram Stoker's Dracula. But what the film will not tell you is that the vampire myth seems to have arisen from unexplained real-life events and that 'vampirism' is a rare disease treated by doctors.

FILM / Absolutely ravishing: Bram Stoker's Dracula

THEY call it Bram Stoker's Dracula, but that won't kid anyone for long. One look at the hypercharged Gothic fantasia unfurling across the screen and you realise this Dracula is the creation of someone very much of our time, someone extravagantly talented and hopelessly muddled - someone like Francis Ford Coppola, in fact. While the form of Stoker's fable has largely been retained - a patchwork of journals, letters and newspaper reports - it's been shaken down and souped up as a luscious spectacle. Coppola's pyrotechnics have gatecrashed the novel and overturned its fin de siecle furniture.

FILM / The beautiful and the damned: Francis Ford Coppola's version of Dracula

SUCCESS in the genre of the Gothic depends on a partial transformation of terror into beauty, and by that standard Francis Ford Coppola's Bram Stoker's Dracula (18) is a failure, but for an unusual reason: the transformation of terror into beauty is absolute, leaving no ghost of a shudder behind. Why should we pretend to be frightened, when in fact we are looking forward to the next astonishing manifestation of what is only notionally evil? How can we be in suspense when we know that our appetite for lurid visual truffles will be fed without a moment's stinting? Even at the film's few sanguinary moments, there is no temptation to look away, since violence too is swallowed up - along with the plot - by the ravishments of design.

SHOW PEOPLE / Five hundred years at the top: 61. Count Dracula

SHERLOCK HOLMES comes close. Frankenstein has not done badly. Gerard Depardieu may have made more films. But none has left his mark on the screen like Vlad the Impaler, Count Dracula.
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