News

French police have identified the man arrested for shooting a newspaper assistant photographer and carrying out three other attacks.

Tight-lipped Lloyds is frustrating the City

Lloyds Banking Group yesterday reaffirmed its pledge to turn a profit for the year, but spooked some analysts with cautious comments and caused frustration with the lack hard information it was prepared to give.

Adrian Hamilton: You can't blame it all on a rogue trader

If you thought that Britain was adept at putting the blame for disaster down the line and never up it, you should look across the Channel. The Paris trial of the rogue trader Jérôme Kerviel for nearly bringing Société Générale down with €4.9bn losses on unauthorised trades ended as you would have expected, with the full majesty of the French law being brought down on the little man.

Rogue trader: €5bn fine is like 'being clubbed'

The disgraced investment banker Jérôme Kerviel spoke for the first time last night about his tough sentencing in history's biggest rogue trading scandal, insisting was he had been made a scapegoat for his former employer and comparing the penalty to being "hit on the head with a club".

Business Diary: Fraser comment is a no-brainer

No doubt Stuart Fraser, abigwig in the City of London Corporation, felt he was among friends when speaking at a Conservative Party conference fringe meeting about the Cityyesterday. Still, it may not have been entirely wise to begin a defence of bankers' bonuses thus: "When God gave out brains, he didn't give them all out equally, and so we have to live in an unequal society."Naturally, his remarks are now doing the rounds of theblogosphere.

€4.9bn fine for man who (almost) broke the bank

Rogue trader made to 'pay for sins of financial world', says lawyer

James Moore: Step forward Jerome Kerviel, court jester of casino capitalism

Outlook Jérôme Kerviel seems to have become a sort of white-collar Raoul Moat. Like the latter, the French rogue trader has been all but lionised for a series of frankly contemptible acts. Now it's true that unlike the execrable Moat, Kerviel didn't kill anyone. No, he just burnt his way through a staggering €5bn of other people's money, almost bringing down Société Générale and everyone who sailed within her.

French rogue trader Jerome Kerviel found guilty of fraud

Former Societe Generale trader Jerome Kerviel was convicted on all counts today in one of history's biggest trading frauds, sentenced to three years in jail and ordered to pay the bank a mind-numbing €4.9bn (£4.25bn) in damages.

Market Report: Trading hopes underpin gains in Marks & Spencer

Marks & Spencer was among the gainers as the FTSE 100 endured a volatile session last night.

Indian courts close Vedanta copper smelter

Vedanta Resources, the Indian mining company that in recent years has been widely condemned for its human rights and environmental record, suffered another blow yesterday when the high court in Madras ordered a subsidiary of the group to close the world's ninth-biggest copper smelter on environmental grounds.

SocGen fined £1.5m for poor reporting

The City watchdog has handed Société Générale, the victim of France's largest ever rogue trading scandal two years ago, a fine of £1.5m after it failed to accurately report millions of trades.

Who really masterminded France's crime of the century?

'I was real brains behind Nice bank heist, not Spaggiari’, claims ‘Amigo’ in new book

David Prosser: The reprieve for Messrs Thiam and McGrath may only be temporary

Outlook Better than expected financial performance, a dividend hike and a reduction in the bill for the aborted purchase of AIG's Asian assets. Surely Prudential's management have done enough to silence those investors who have been calling for their heads since the humiliating failure to seal the AIG deal?

Profits up at SocGen and StanChart

Standard Chartered and France's Société Générale joined the list of banks posting better than expected results yesterday, although both warned that the outlook remained uncertain.

Market Report: British Land tries to build on its financial advantages

British Land was in the spotlight last night as analysts argued that the property group was well placed to stand firm in an environment where bank financing remains a fraught topic.

General Marcel Bigeard: Soldier who served in three conflicts and became an expert on counter-insurgency

General Marcel Bigeard was one of France's most adored and decorated military commanders and was a veteran of three wars who became the doyen of counter-insurgency. A veteran of the Second World War, France's colonial wars in Indo-China and Algeria, Bigeard rose up from the lowest rank to become a four-star general. Much to the annoyance of the top brass, he was loved by the troops and gained a reputation as a tough, no-nonsense commander who led by example, being wounded on five occasions and escaping captivity three times. A 1958 profile of him in Time magazine captured his tough-as-nails persona: "A martinet, but the idol of his men, Bigeard whipped them into shape by running them as much as 15 miles at a time. He made them shave every day, no matter where they were, doled out raw onions instead of the traditional wine ration because 'wine reduces stamina.'"

Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project