Singer's money troubles

TONY HADLEY, the former lead singer of the Eighties pop group Spandau Ballet, told the High Court in London yesterday of his "desperate" financial situation as his attempts to build a solo career crumbled.

True! Spandau Ballet are big hit with judge

THE HALLOWED halls of the High Court in London echoed yesterday with the strains of Eighties pop innovators Spandau Ballet.

Spandau Ballet battle over fees in court

`TO CUT A LONG Story Short', as their very first single put it, the New Romantics have fallen out of love.

BBC banks on Monet and the millennium

BBC1 MADE a claim for the moral high ground yesterday with a pounds 125m winter schedule designed to prove that populism and preaching can mix.

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The Wedding Singer

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LIVE REVIEW Midge Ure Fleece and Firkin, Bristol

`Don't be expecting too much," said Ure as he took the stage. "We've only had one rehearsal, and this is the second." He needn't have bothered, for we were all too busy craning forward to see if those legendary sideburns still ended in their trademark point, which, unfortunately, they didn't. Once upon a time, the spirit of the age resided in the rakish angle of Ure's facial hair. Way back when, a generation had watched enraptured as the sideboards had grown from the bum-fluff of teeny-bop combo Slik (remember those baseball jackets?), to the punkish edge of the Rich Kids (Ure plus ex-Sex Pistol Glen Matlock), and onwards to the finely honed point of New Romantics Ultravox, dry-ice kings of the early pop-video age. Then, Midge was rock-bloke No1, aide-de-camp to General Geldof in the Ethiopian campaign, fond uncle to troubled youngsters Boy George and Marilyn and provider of sensitive trouser advice to Spandau Ballet. "They said there'd be a young audience," Ure said to the respectably full house of fans from his bygone days. "You're not, so why should we be?" replied a wit in the audience, as the pomp and circumstance of the opening number, "Fade to Grey" (a hit for Steve Strange's Visage), began to rattle over the PA.

LEST WE FORGET SAM BROWN

With parents like 1960s popsters Joe and Vicki Brown, there was always a good chance that Sam Brown would find the music biz too enticing to resist. And so, after years of backing work with acts as varied as The Small Faces and Spandau Ballet, as well as becoming a Womble, she released a best-selling album whose title track, "Stop", topped the charts around the world. That was a decade ago and, though a successful follow- up appeared shortly afterwards, she grew disenchanted with certain aspects of the industry. She released a tribute album to her mother, who died from cancer in 1991, on her own label before retiring to Scotland to raise a family. But she could not stay away. Lured back as a featured singer with Pink Floyd, she went on to work with Jools Holland and Fish (from Marillion). Now, independent label Demon is about to release a new album, Box, which shows off her powerful vocal talents to the full - particularly on the title track and the arresting "I Forgive You", the new single co-written with Maria McKee.

Regrets, they have a few

You're rich, you're famous, you have Fashion Victim Fever. Don't despair, Annalisa Barbieri is here to help

Frock horror: should men wear skirts?

Some certainly think so, reports Lucy O'Brien

Obituary: Billy MacKenzie

Billy MacKenzie had the voice of an angel. Once you'd heard MacKenzie, the singer with The Associates, you were either hooked and became a fan, or your teeth were on edge every time one of his records came on the radio.

A man who won't be labelled

Top rock bands sprang from his Chrysalis. Now the music maestro is banging the drum for sport. Paul Farrelly reports

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Say a little prayer

Jim White offers Glenn Hoddle a crash course on the worst job in English football

Rock on Tommy

Tommy defined the term 'rock opera' when Cast's John Power was still in nappies. Tonight the musical opens in the West End. What does this mean to the Cast generation? By Jim White
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