Stanley Kubrick

Watch the entire history of the planet in under two minutes

Curious about the history of our planet, but quite busy today? Internet artists melodysheep have the solution. They've edited together various pieces of footage and some lovely music to create a visualisation of the entire history of our planet in under two minutes.

It’s a crime to remake a cult hit

A terrified teenage girl runs for her life; a secretive detective finds herself lumbered with a difficult case as she prepares to leave for a new life; a devastated family struggle to come to terms with their daughter's murder.

Tony Curtis: Actor who started out as a teen heartthrob and became a

An actor with dark, curly hair and handsome looks, Tony Curtis began his film career playing small roles as gangsters or juvenile delinquents before his popularity with teenagers won him stardom at Universal in swashbuckling fantasies such as The Prince Who Was a Thief (1951) and The Black Shield of Falworth (1954). Elvis Presley is said to have modelled his hairstyle on Curtis, whose marriage to the equally attractive Janet Leigh made the pair a popular subject of fan magazines throughout the Fifties.

Diary: 'Take 35' for film star Carla

Gleeful reports in the British press this week regarding Carla Bruni's trials and tribulations on Woody Allen's film set suggest Meryl Streep need not be losing any sleep quite yet. We're told – with maybe a hint of exaggeration – that it took France's First Lady a whopping 35 takes to convincingly exit a grocery store. Apparently the problem was caused by the fact "Madame Fancy Pants" couldn't stop staring at the camera! As the Daily Mail helpfully pointed out, it's not the first time she's tried to "monopolise" the lense. Apparently on a visit to London she shamelessly deployed all her "feline charm" in the direction of hapless snappers "licking her lips seductively" and offering a "husky 'bonjour'." (Glad I missed all that). Still, suggestions Bruni's take-tally could be one for the record books are wide of the mark. According to film historians, that honour still goes to one Shelley Duvall, who was obliged to perform 127 takes of the infamous" baseball-bat" scene with Jack Nicholson in The Shining before director Stanley Kubrick was satisfied. Still time Carla.

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Jim Thompson: Pulp friction

They're criticised for being violent and misogynistic, but Jim Thompson's Fifties novels make for compelling cinema, as a new version of The Killer Inside Me proves

Not for their consideration: notable omissions in this year's Academy

The Academy has always had its blind spots. Over the years, many films subsequently acknowledged as gilt-edged masterpieces have been completely frozen out of the Oscars. The list of omissions stretches from Howard Hawks' 'The Big Sleep' to Charlie Chaplin's 'Modern Times', from the Marx brothers' 'A Night at the Opera' to Stanley Kubrick's 'Paths of Glory', from Orson Welles's 'Chimes at Midnight' to John Ford's 'The Searchers'. Westerns, comedies and gangster films have been especially unfortunate – and you don't find many horror movies in the mix, either.