Environment Nadhim Zahawi (right) is an adviser to the Prime Minister

Nadhim Zahawi says 'massive, irreversible damage' is being caused

Twelfth Night, Courtyard Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

A Malvolio who's hard to believe in

The Spanish Tragedy, Arcola, London<br/>Annie Get Your Gun, Young Vic, London<br/>Twelfth Night, Courtyard, Stratford-Upon-Avon

A rarely staged Elizabethan classic that influenced Shakespeare returns to the stage and leaves it soaked with blood and gore

The Drunks/The Grain Store, Courtyard, Stratford-upon-Avon

The RSC is temporarily known as the Royal Soviet Company, with two brand new Russian plays, specially commissioned, playing in the Courtyard for just over a month to launch a four-year project called "Other Russia".

The Grain Store / The Drunks, Courtyard, Stratford-upon-Avon<br/>Our Class, NT Cottesloe, London<br/>An Inspector Calls, Novello, London

The terrible famine wrought on the Ukraine by Stalin is tackled in a new play for the RSC's Revolutions season

Diary Of A Fresher: 'University is the most intense, bizarre, otherwordly place ...'

So it's over. Or, at least, the first third of it is. I'm home now, and, I suppose, no longer a fresher. This will be my last diary entry. If you've been following me, I hope you've enjoyed watching my first year unfold. Bonus points if you've managed to work out what university I'm at. Double if you guessed my subject. If you actually know who I am, say hi sometime. Discreetly.

Bulldog bash security 'over the top' claim organisers

Organisers of a controversial motorcycle festival accused a police force today of being "over the top" with its security operation.

Roman silver haul declared treasure trove

A collection of more than 1,000 Roman coins found in farmland was officially declared treasure trove today.

Julius Caesar, Courtyard, Stratford-upon-Avon

Like Hermia in The Dream, I am amazed and know not what to say: the seething mob takes a bow at the end of the new RSC Julius Caesar – but they are on film. The video empire strikes back, assuming a reality of relationship with a theatre audience that cannot possibly exist. Or can it?

As You Like It, Courtyard, Stratford-upon-Avon

The Royal Shakespeare Company's new Rosalind, Katy Stephens, points out in the programme that her job is "not to be great" but to tell a love story, "together with everyone involved". To some extent, she succeeds. But an audience's job in this play is to fall in love with Rosalind, and I'm not sure that we do.

The Tempest, Courtyard Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

Spirits, sorcery and star quality

RSC haka angers Maori tribe

Theatre company accused of showing contempt for the traditional dance in its production of &#8216;The Taming of the Shrew&#8217;

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Novello Theatre, London

You can usually bank on "The Dream" not lasting more than three hours, but Gregory Doran's fussy, unerotic RSC revival – a retread of his far more spirited 2005 "bottom of a supermarket trolley" Stratford-upon-Avon production – trundles on past the three-hour mark through the unfunniest "Pyramus and Thisbe" interlude I've seen in ages.

Minor British Institutions: Paxton & Whitfield

The best thing about Paxton & Whitfield is the smell. Like the best cheeses, the best cheese shop has a rather heady aroma, an olfactory precursor of caseophiliac delights to follow. In other words, they sell very tasty cheese, and, for such a posh establishment in the heart of St James's in London, are a friendly, unpretentious lot. It has plenty of royal warrants, and was a favourite of Winston Churchill, who once said that "a gentleman only buys his cheese at Paxton & Whitfield". Indeed so.

Don John, Courtyard Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

A shot of raunchy humour from the original seducer

Three die in helicopter crash

Accident investigators will today begin examining the wreckage of a burnt-out helicopter that crashed yesterday, killing three people on board. The private, Gazelle helicopter came down in thick mist on farmland near Winchcombe, Gloucestershire, and burst into flames.

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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices