Arts and Entertainment Wayne Coyne of Flaming Lips in concert, The Roundhouse, London

"I feel a whole lot better," maintains a hoarse Wayne Coyne, apologising for being too ill to play the previous day's cancelled concert before informing us that "being sick is pretty petty" compared to the tornado disaster in Oklahoma, his home state. It is. He goes on to admit that "this is kind of a ridiculous event". It's certainly an odd event.

TELEVISION London Shouting / Only an Excuse (BBC2) A voice crying in the wilderness of the summer schedule, Alan Parker gives us truth, not lies. Presumably.

The silly season is television's rubbish tip. Programmes that can't find a place in the schedules at any other time of year are bulldozed into August and left to rot among the repeats: the bussed-in mini-series, the season of documentaries about old age (honestly, there's one coming up), the stray dramas there's no other space for because Alan Yentob has over-commissioned.

Britpop's new movers and shakers

Kula Shaker could be the Next Big Thing: but first they'll be groomed by the image makers. Can they remain unfazed by the 'creative' advice of stylists, photographers and hairdressers?

To Britpop: six Britpups

Britpop arrived on a wave, and kept rolling.

critics' choice

CINEMA

Pop record reviews

Manic Street Preachers

Angela Lewis on pop

Last summer, Welsh surreal rockers Super Furry Animals played their debut London show in front of about 20 people (including half a dozen NME music journalists), supporting Eddie Tudorpole. They looked conventional - almost disappointingly so - but they cranked up a curious mix of baffling Welsh lyrics and 1970s prog guitar riffs that threw up so many weird ideas, they held huge promise indeed. Fulfilled in part by atheist's doodle "God Show Me Magic!", their first top-40 hit. It's typical Super Furry Animal territory, in that it appears daft - zippy and fun like a children's TV theme - but with a sharp message about lack of belief in God.

Indie's Trade secret

Acklam Road in west London was the original address of the first, and rightly legendary Rough Trade shop, which opened in 1976. Countless fans of left-field music owe their record collection to Rough Trade, who, like John Peel, have opened people's eyes to a huge world of eclectic, obscure sound. Let's face it, back in 1976 your chances of finding that limited edition New York Dolls seven inch on lurid pink vinyl in Woolworth's were pretty damn slim. And now that the alternative crowd have well and truly broken into the mainstream charts, this week of gigs, dubbed "Acklam Hall Revisited", should be seen as both a victory and anniversary celebration.
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