News The charity Stonewall revealed its Top 100 Employers list on Wednesday

Organisations to receive recognition from the charity include an NHS Trust, and a housing company

Tom Lubbock: 1957-2011

An untutored eye, a dazzling intellect, and – always – a provocative stance

Simon Starling: Never the Same River, Camden Arts Centre, London

Starling's show slips between histories as he brings together works from CAC shows of the past 50 years

Fiona Banner: The Naked Ear, Frith Street Gallery, London

Fiona Banner's current installation in the Duveen Galleries at Tate Britain, Harrier and Jaguar (2010), sees two fighter planes dominating one of the grand spaces of the museum. It's an uncomfortable triple sublime: force x power x impressive aesthetics, but oddly underwhelming as art. Elsewhere in London, at Frith Street Gallery, is a literal echo of that installation. An enormous bell greets you at the gallery, hung low from supports in the ceiling. The sculpture is ominously named Tornado (2010) has been cast from the melted-down fuselage of a Tornado jet fighter – a deadly efficient machine of war. For whom does this bell toll? The idea of a deep, sonorous bell ring rings with signification: the passing of time, births, deaths and marriages. A large single bell like this, however, given its name and its history, is more likely to bring to mind mourning, warning and doom. The death-knell. How many times did this particular plane bring about death and destruction? Nearby is a stack of every copy of Jane's All the World's Aircraft, from 1909-2010. A heap of language that describes only destructive capability and armature, freed from the bloodshed, the conflict and the history of the wars for which such impressive machines are made.

Students protest over cuts at ceremony

Up to 40 students staged a three-hour sit-in at Tate Britain before last night's Turner Prize ceremony to protest against threatened cuts to arts education funding.

Now the Turner Prize jury goes for a song

Susan Philipsz becomes first sound artist to receive prestigious award

Tom Sutcliffe: Dramatic pause that says so much

The week in culture

Cultural Life: Susan Philipsz, artist

Visual Arts: Michael Fullerton's recent show Columbia at Chisenhale Gallery worked on many different levels. It was intelligent, thought-provoking, tender and beautiful all at the same time. In Warsaw, the Museum of Modern Art are doing some really interesting things. They create projects around the city and harness the support of the artist community that lives there.

Fiona Banner, Frith Street Gallery, London

An index of military aircraft is a cenotaph, the Bayeaux Tapestry a brutal essay, in a muscular show about writing

Cultural Life: Angela de la Cruz, artist

Visual Arts: The last exhibitions I went to see were Wolfgang Tillmans and Jean Nouvel. The Jean Nouvel pavilion was wonderful and the Wolfgang Tillmans exhibition was very exciting. I also saw the Fiona Banner installation at the Tate Britain, which I also think was good and impressive.

Turner Prize 2010, Tate Britain, London

This year's competition is more than usually rational and really rather good, but please, can we skip the tedious theorising – just once before I die?

Turner Prize is far from picture perfect

You can almost guarantee The Turner Prize to cause a rumpus for one reason or another but this year's row was an unusual spat between the photographers who'd arrived to cover the exhibition's launch and Tate Britain.

Turner Prize launch greeted with protests

The UK's most prestigious - and controversial - modern art award was launched today amid protests by photographers and artists alike.

This week's Critics' Choice

Eadweard Muybridge, Tate Britain, London

This pioneering Victorian photographer led a hectic and colourful life, but his efforts for art and science are not what they seem

Art of the art game: Peter Bazalgette reveals how curators can take control of their own media coverage

Why do galleries invite journalists to sip champagne on opening night?
News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
people
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Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
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'Weird Al' Yankovic, or Alfred Matthew, at the 2014 Los Angeles Film Festival Screening of
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New Real Madrid signing James Rodríguez with club president Florentino Perez
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Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn