News The charity Stonewall revealed its Top 100 Employers list on Wednesday

Organisations to receive recognition from the charity include an NHS Trust, and a housing company

Rachel Whiteread: Drawings, Tate Britain, London

A day in the life of a door knob

Rachel Whiteread: 'I've done the same thing over and over'

As an exhibition of drawings by the Turner Prize winner Rachel Whiteread opens at Tate Britain, John Walsh meets the artist in her studio and tries to get to the bottom of her methods and obsessions

The Romantics, Tate Britain, London

Landscape with everlasting hellfire

Harrier and Jaguar, Tate Britain, London

An installation by Fiona Banner is more politically subversive than headline-grabbing, anti-BP demos

Editor-At-Large: Children need good parents, not a state nanny

Frank Field, given the mission of grappling with poverty by David Cameron, is one of the few MPs who remains an inspirational character. Asked by Tony Blair to "think the unthinkable" and reform the benefits system, he was dumped a year later after a row with Gordon Brown. Asked last week if Cameron might do the same, he wryly commented, "He doesn't have the same problems in No 11". True, there's no Gordon brooding in the background, but more than a decade later, Mr Field has a much tougher job.

Naughty by nature: Why has Britain become so rude?

It shapes our humour, politics and even fine art – rudeness comes easily to the British. After all, it's what separates us from Johnny foreigner, says John Walsh

William Turnbull: Retrospectively beyond our time

An exhibition of the work of William Turnbull, 88, one of the most important living British artists, opens tomorrow at Waddington Galleries.

Rude awakening: A new Tate exhibition details the revolution fomented by visual satire (and downright smut!)

During the 1780s, the French ambassador to the Court of St James is rumoured to have written a despatch to Versailles, outlining his fears that Britain was teetering on the verge of revolution. He'd reached this disturbing conclusion because of the free availability of ribald satirical prints depicting members of the Royal Family. These prints by James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson and many others were merciless in their lèse-majesté: if he was lucky, George III would escape with being portrayed as a bovine rustic bumpkin; his son was never lucky enough to be shown as anything but a drunken, lecherous buffoon.

Tate to exhibit photographer whose pioneering work inspired 'The Matrix'

He was a 19th-century pioneer in the emerging art of photography whose images have since inspired a host of artists, including classical composers, film directors and the rock band U2.

Turner-winning art bequeathed to the nation (well, sort of...)

Martin Creed donates 'The Lights Going On and Off' – minus the switch and bulb

Michael Glover: Hepworth's work was purer and more cerebral than Moore's

The names of Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth will forever be intertwined. Born in the same part of Yorkshire and within five years of each other, they went on to work together.

Mary Dejevsky: It really won't be the internet that wins it

Not a day now goes by without someone dubbing the coming election the e-election, the Twitter election, the Facebook election, the first British election that will be won or lost in the virtual world. My inbox is stuffed with invitations to hear stars of the youthful e-establishment and their older acolytes expatiate on the theme. So far as I can judge, our revolutionary e-election has eclipsed climate change as the belief of the age – and it is being preached with similar evangelistic fervour.

Henry Moore, Tate Britain, London

The town-square monoliths of his late period were far from the sculptor's finest work, as this retrospective shows

Henry Moore: Invasion of the genetic mutants

Masterpieces – or works whose formless monstrosity is little short of grotesque? As the Henry Moore retrospective opens at Tate Britain, Tom Lubbock adjudicates

BBC to reveal unseen Henry Moore

Groundbreaking deal allows footage of sculptor at work to be shown to public. Ian Burrell reports
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash
Shipping container hotels: Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Spending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but these mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Native American headdresses are not fashion accessories

Feather dust-up

A Canadian festival has banned Native American headwear. Haven't we been here before?
Boris Johnson's war on diesel

Boris Johnson's war on diesel

11m cars here run on diesel. It's seen as a greener alternative to unleaded petrol. So why is London's mayor on a crusade against the black pump?
5 best waterproof cameras

Splash and flash: 5 best waterproof cameras

Don't let water stop you taking snaps with one of these machines that will take you from the sand to meters deep
Louis van Gaal interview: Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era

Louis van Gaal interview

Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era
Will Gore: The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series

Will Gore: Outside Edge

The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series
The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz