News The charity Stonewall revealed its Top 100 Employers list on Wednesday

Organisations to receive recognition from the charity include an NHS Trust, and a housing company

Parties: Grayson Perry zigs and Bill Nighy zags at Tate Britain's summer party

Guests ummed and ahhed as they wound themselves around Eva Rothschild's giant, room-encompassing zig-zag of a sculpture that was the centrepiece for Tate Britain's summer party on Monday.

Party Of The Week: Cool Pimm's, Cold Corners at the Tate

The Tate Britain Summer Party on Monday night was crammed with artists. Grayson Perry wore a typically gaudy multicoloured summer dress and was joined by Sirs Peter Blake and Howard Hodgkin, and Richard Long. They wandered among the aluminium beams of Eva Rothschild's new Duveens Commission Cold Corners – a huge, angular structure that stretches the full length of the gallery and which is fondly referred to as the "scribble in space".

Little-known artist takes over the Tate

It is one of the country's largest spaces to showcase the best of British sculpture, so being commissioned to create an artwork for the Duveen Galleries - the central space in Tate Britain - has not just drawn in hordes of visitors but also cemented the reputations of Britain's boldest contemporary artists.

New kids on the Bloc: Poland's young artists arrive in the UK

Even as the dissembling greed of politicians becomes the latest theatre of the absurd in Britain, an exhibition of far greater socio-political depth is being mounted at the Sainsbury Centre in Norwich. The show brings together the work of the legendary artist-performer Tadeusz Kantor, who died in 1990, just after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and that of 16 of Poland's New Wave artists. This is the blue touchpaper for Polska! Year, a series of 200 Polish cultural events in the next 12 months, including shows at Tate Britain and the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow.

Richard Long: Walks on the wild side

Richard Long's photographs are evocative records of his journeys, but sometimes they can be more like postcards than art, says Tom Lubbock

Art for the young at heart

The Tate's first interactive exhibition is back – 40 years after injuries forced its closure. Chris Green reports

Arts and minds at the Tate

Tate Britain is working with the NHS to help people with mental illness

Nicholas Serota: How Long's artwork changed our world

Richard Long's 'A Line Made by Walking' captures the experience of being alone on this earth

Diamonds, crystals and bare backsides – it's Turner time!

Jury goes for showmanship and theatricality in £25,000 prize show

Blake 1809, Tate Britain, London

This exhibition was given a critical drubbing when it opened 200 years ago. Since then the painter's reputation has gone from lunatic to visionary, so how do those works look now?

Tate rebuilds installation that left the biggest impression

Gallery's first interactive exhibit – which gave art lovers splinters – is to return after 38 years

My Week: Gaynor Arnold, Orange Prize-nominated author

The author of 'Girl in a Blue Dress' explains how she balances her job at an adoption agency with a writing career

Robert Bevan and the Cumberland Market Group, Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal

A year ago, an exhibition at Tate Britain reminded us of the existence of the Camden Town Group of painters. Their art, chiefly urban in subject matter, represented a low-key British version of post-Impressionism. It sputtered into, and out of, life just before the First World War.

The art of nothing: Pompidou Centre celebrates half a century of minimalism

Art exhibitions without exhibits are nothing new. Nothing has been a recognised art form for half a century. But the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris can claim a cultural first this week: a retrospective exhibition of 51 years of exhibitions without exhibits by nine different artists. How can a museum retrospectively exhibit nothing? With great care. The 500-page catalogue costs €39 (£34).

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Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
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Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
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Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

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Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape