News The charity Stonewall revealed its Top 100 Employers list on Wednesday

Organisations to receive recognition from the charity include an NHS Trust, and a housing company

Parties: Grayson Perry zigs and Bill Nighy zags at Tate Britain's summer party

Guests ummed and ahhed as they wound themselves around Eva Rothschild's giant, room-encompassing zig-zag of a sculpture that was the centrepiece for Tate Britain's summer party on Monday.

Party Of The Week: Cool Pimm's, Cold Corners at the Tate

The Tate Britain Summer Party on Monday night was crammed with artists. Grayson Perry wore a typically gaudy multicoloured summer dress and was joined by Sirs Peter Blake and Howard Hodgkin, and Richard Long. They wandered among the aluminium beams of Eva Rothschild's new Duveens Commission Cold Corners – a huge, angular structure that stretches the full length of the gallery and which is fondly referred to as the "scribble in space".

Little-known artist takes over the Tate

It is one of the country's largest spaces to showcase the best of British sculpture, so being commissioned to create an artwork for the Duveen Galleries - the central space in Tate Britain - has not just drawn in hordes of visitors but also cemented the reputations of Britain's boldest contemporary artists.

New kids on the Bloc: Poland's young artists arrive in the UK

Even as the dissembling greed of politicians becomes the latest theatre of the absurd in Britain, an exhibition of far greater socio-political depth is being mounted at the Sainsbury Centre in Norwich. The show brings together the work of the legendary artist-performer Tadeusz Kantor, who died in 1990, just after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and that of 16 of Poland's New Wave artists. This is the blue touchpaper for Polska! Year, a series of 200 Polish cultural events in the next 12 months, including shows at Tate Britain and the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow.

Richard Long: Walks on the wild side

Richard Long's photographs are evocative records of his journeys, but sometimes they can be more like postcards than art, says Tom Lubbock

Art for the young at heart

The Tate's first interactive exhibition is back – 40 years after injuries forced its closure. Chris Green reports

Arts and minds at the Tate

Tate Britain is working with the NHS to help people with mental illness

Nicholas Serota: How Long's artwork changed our world

Richard Long's 'A Line Made by Walking' captures the experience of being alone on this earth

Diamonds, crystals and bare backsides – it's Turner time!

Jury goes for showmanship and theatricality in £25,000 prize show

Blake 1809, Tate Britain, London

This exhibition was given a critical drubbing when it opened 200 years ago. Since then the painter's reputation has gone from lunatic to visionary, so how do those works look now?

Tate rebuilds installation that left the biggest impression

Gallery's first interactive exhibit – which gave art lovers splinters – is to return after 38 years

My Week: Gaynor Arnold, Orange Prize-nominated author

The author of 'Girl in a Blue Dress' explains how she balances her job at an adoption agency with a writing career

Robert Bevan and the Cumberland Market Group, Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal

A year ago, an exhibition at Tate Britain reminded us of the existence of the Camden Town Group of painters. Their art, chiefly urban in subject matter, represented a low-key British version of post-Impressionism. It sputtered into, and out of, life just before the First World War.

The art of nothing: Pompidou Centre celebrates half a century of minimalism

Art exhibitions without exhibits are nothing new. Nothing has been a recognised art form for half a century. But the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris can claim a cultural first this week: a retrospective exhibition of 51 years of exhibitions without exhibits by nine different artists. How can a museum retrospectively exhibit nothing? With great care. The 500-page catalogue costs €39 (£34).

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