Tate Britain

Tate gives a big show to Roy Lichtenstein

The Tate Modern will next year stage the first major UK exhibition devoted to Roy Lichtenstein in 20 years, its most comprehensive retrospective of the celebrated pop artist. The exhibition, which opens next spring, will bring together 125 of the artist's definitive paintings and sculptures.

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Art that goes back to the futurist

The Vorticists may have only been active for a short period of time, but their influence and importance still burn bright, says Adrian Hamilton

Through a glass darkly: Tate Britain celebrates the work of Alvin

A broken mirror, edges jagged, would be a fitting metaphor for the photographs by Alvin Langdon Coburn, taken early last century. He was smashing convention, refracting reality, elevating partial reflections over traditional images. It's not just a metaphor, though: the pictures he took in this period – vortographs, as they became known – were shot through the prism of three pieces of glass, splitting the image into segments, creating weird and wonderful distortions. "Why should not the camera throw off the shackles of conventional representation and attempt something fresh and untried?" Coburn wrote. "Why should not perspective be studied from angles hitherto neglected or unobserved?" His words might seem naïve when read from the perspective of this century, with our countless ways of seeing. But this was 1916, and Coburn's thoughts were radical.