Arts and Entertainment
 

The first 45 minutes of this eschatological thriller-farce features some of the best work director Edgar Wright and co-screenwriter Simon Pegg have done. The film completes a loose trilogy begun with the excellent Shaun of the Dead (2004) and continued in the so-so Hot Fuzz (2007).

Pandora: BBC faces Ofcom row over interview edits

Following all the drama surrounding "Crowngate", the BBC is about to rocked by another testing row over its recent series, Earth: The Climate Wars.

Paperbacks: How to Lose Friends and Alienate People, by Toby Young

This about-to-be successful re-issue of the successful book, published to coincide with the successful film, goes to prove the backwards mantra that nothing succeeds like failure.

Screen test: Look what they've done to my book!

Book-writing is a very different art from writing screenplays. So what happens when an author's cherished creation finds itself in Hollywood's tender embrace? Charlotte Cripps asked nine novelists how they cope

A real page-turner? No, but it may change the way we read

An electronic gadget capable of storing hundreds of downloadable "ebooks" that could do for the written word what the iPod did for music is to be launched in over 300 stores across Britain

Death by Leisure, By Chris Ayres

The second memoir by The Times journalist Chris Ayres is one of those books, in the mould of Toby Young's, in which a callow British journalist tries to make it in America: part anthropological study of LA, part self-deprecating comic misadventure. He blags his way into Michael Jackson's 40th birthday party but is chased away by Mike Tyson's entourage. He goes to a red- carpet gala, but the only tuxedo left in town is two sizes too small for him. He also tries by ever more desperate means to woo an improbably well-connected supermodel, despite the fact that he's pale, poor, and has been left permanently scarred by acne and a middle-class British upbringing.

Tim Fountain: I'm not just a sex freak...

Tim Fountain's one-man show 'Sex Addict' caused ire all round. Now he's back with a guide to sexual shenanigans up and down the country. Partly, as he tells Peter York, to discover if he's all that unusual

The real stars of Cannes

Forget the Palme d'Or – the real action has been at the parties, premieres and press conferences. And there have been some award-winning performances

Tarka Cordell: a life in the fast lane

He was born into a rock 'n' roll world of glamour, wealth and opportunity. But the dashing, charismatic Tarka Cordell never quite found his groove – and this week, he took his own life. Tim Walker reports

Jessica Hynes: 'I'm ready to fall flat on my face again, but at least I'll do so on my own terms'

All the main players of cult 1990s sitcom 'Spaced' went on to Hollywood careers – except one. Jessica Hynes reveals how she's playing catch-up with Simon Pegg and Nick Frost

He's got more columns than the Colosseum: the prolific Mr Letts

A review before bedtime, a TV appearance before breakfast and a day of non-stop writing that might take in theatres, parliamentary sketches and gossip. Britain's busiest freelance journalist somehow finds time to talk to Vincent Graff

The art of the argument

It might be bad news for your crockery, but scientists now claim that a blazing row with the 'other half' can also be good for your health. But is that just fighting talk? We asked a panel of experts...

Real lives: The good feud guide

The public slanging match is a venerable tradition - and today's stars are just as keen as yesterday's, says HESTER LACEY

Media: What's a girl like you doing on a magazine like this?

The woman once voted `most likely to run a brothel' is cracking the editorial whip at the Erotic Review.

HOW WE MET: DEREK DRAPER AND CHARLOTTE RAVEN

New Labour commentator Derek Draper recently achieved notoriety when the 'Observer' newspaper accused him of boasting of his contacts in the Government. Draper, 31, began his political career at Manchester University and went on to be chief researcher to Peter Mandelson MP. He wrote the controversial 'Blair's 100 Days' before moving on to political lobbying and, latterly, broadcasting. Charlotte Raven, 29, is a 'Guardian' columnist and commentator on women's issues. She began her journalistic career on the 'Modern Review', where she famously attempted an editorial coup after beginning a affair with its owner, Julie Burchill. Last year she re-launched the magazine, which has just folded after six issues
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Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness