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A street artist tribute to Trigger might have moved commuters, but it seems staff at Southern didn't share their appreciation

OBITUARY:Sir James Darling

James Darling was an Englishman who became a great Australian; and he was doubly a Victorian - he was born in the reign of Queen Victoria and he emigrated in January 1930 to the State of Victoria to begin what became a 32-year headmastership of Geelong Grammar School: one that proved of seminal importance to both that school and his adopted country. In Australia's Bicentennial year, 1988, he was one of 200 men and women formally designated Great Australians from the 200 years since the British settlement of 1788, one of only 22 then living, and the only headmaster among the 200. He has some claim to be called Australia's greatest educator.

ISIS GCSE results, 1995

ISIS GCSE results, 1995

No 28: So, you want to take the ghost train?

A weekly chronicle of the absurdities caused by the Government's privatisation programme

Babe Alex leaving home base

Any kid with an ounce of street cred would start planning revenge if his parents went on holiday alone and returned with just a pile of airport tat. (You've seen the T-shirt: "My parents went to Barbados and all I got...") But Alex Malhoudis was far from disappointed when his mother came back from New York in 1988 bearing baseball caps, a few programmes and the inevitable T-shirt. In fact, they changed his life.

No 26: So you want to go to Etchingham?

True stories from the Great Railway Disaster; A weekly chronicle of the absurdities caused by the Government's privatisation programme

Prefects back in fashion as schools look to leadership

Head girls and boys - and old-fashioned leadership qualities - are back in fashion and the girls are ahead of the boys in contests to lead their schools.

Selling cakes doesn't mean there's icing

Fran Abrams finds fetes and fayres now pay for a school's essentials. Meanwhile, Wendy Berliner has a ball in Bedfordshire

LETTER : Angry and joyful on VE Day

From Ms Sheila Sharp

Travel News

Trouble on t' tours

Not just a pretty mind

Book:AN EXPERIMENT IN LOVE by Hilary Mantel, Viking £15

Letter:Discreet digging for black gold

I WAS disappointed by your article "The blackstuff goes well beyond Windsor" (11 December). Your main premise misleads by implying that the issue of an exploration licence by the DTI gives carte blanche to unchecked oil and gas exploration in that area. This is not the case. Stringent local planning procedures must be adhered to for all drilling and production applications, as is indeed happening at Windsor. As far as I know, no such applications have ever been, or are likely to be, submitted for the well-known urban monuments that you list. Apart from many other considerations, most local authorities stipulate a minimum distance of 300 metres between a proposed drilling site and adjacent dwellings.

FOOD & DRINK / Grapevine: Kathryn McWhirter on a great Spanish region

WINEMAKERS normally fall over themselves to open bottles for visiting wine writers. Not so the makers of Vega Sicilia, Spain's most expensive red wine.

High morals running wild: Anna Pavord continues her Workshop series with advice for a couple who want a wildlife garden that is not just a mess

WE ARE attempting to create a garden which restores a little piece of land to nature, in essence a wildlife garden which looks attractive and where we can also grow native plants, vegetables, fruit and herbs.

Widows hit by tax rule blow: Sue Fieldman reveals how the date of a husband's death can cost his wife hundreds of pounds in lost benefit

THOUSANDS of widows are losing money on a tax benefit just because their husbands died at the wrong time of year.

Bunhill: Famous flock to the family feast

ON 3 NOVEMBER, at Tallow Chandlers Hall, Spitalfields, a dinner party will be held for a very select band of people indeed - the Cazalets.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent