Arts and Entertainment

A familiar story of Lennon's post-Beatles years – with some fascinating new detail

David Quantick: The bad news: Everything is dire. The good news: Satire is back

After years in the doldrums, comedy with an edge returns to the screen. Our writer is laughing

Assange is a 'hi-tech terrorist', says Biden

The US Vice-President, Joe Biden, yesterday likened Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks who is currently under house arrest in a private mansion in Suffolk, to a "hi-tech terrorist" and confirmed that the administration is searching for ways to take legal action against him.

Terence Blacker: The good that comes from revolt

The students have overturned the assumption that theirs is a cosseted generation who can be kept quiet with a Facebook page

Afghan and Iraq veteran makes history with Medal of Honor

The United States's highest military honour was for the first time awarded to a living veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars yesterday.

Cluster bombs kill another child as nations reach accord

International delegates meeting in Laos – the most heavily bombed nation on earth as a result of a huge US bombing campaign during the Vietnam war, and where 80 million landmines still cause death and tragedy on a near-daily basis – have agreed on a new plan to help rid the world of cluster munitions. The agreement came as a 10-year-old Laotian girl was killed by a cluster bomb.

Johann Hari: Protest works. Just look at the proof

Yes, you can choose to do nothing. But you will be choosing to let yourself and your family and your country be ripped off

Joan Smith: Furious stunts make faith look foolish

Until last week, the university city of Gainesville, Florida, wasn't much talked about outside its home state. Students of US history may recall the Gainesville Eight, a group of anti-Vietnam war protesters who were acquitted on charges of breaking up the Republican convention in 1972; these days the city (population 125,000) has its first gay mayor, suggesting that it doesn't easily fit stereotypes about the American South.

Moishe Rosen: Evangelist who founded the Jews for Jesus movement

Born to Jewish parents in the American Midwest during the depression years, Martin "Moishe" Rosen converted to Christianity when he was 21, became a Baptist minister and founded Jews for Jesus, an organisation that spread worldwide with the aim of converting Jews to believe in Jesus as the Messiah. Like him, the group's followers consider themselves Jews by identity, but not religion, and have become the largest messianic Jewish organisation in the world. They describe Rosen as "the godfather of Jewish evangelism".

Nixon's backers make last stand over Watergate

Take a healthy dose of paranoia. Toss in dark allegations of a left-wing smear campaign. Finish with a furious dispute over whether to give the American public access to some potentially revelatory tape recordings, and you've got a simmering political controversy that could only really involve one man: the former US president Richard Nixon.

In the shadow of Vietnam: A close encounter with Karl Marlantes, US marine turned literary giant

As a soldier in Vietnam, Karl Marlantes exalted in slaughter. Yet he has spent 30 years writing a novel about the futility of war – and now it's a best-seller.

Fighting talk: The new propaganda

Journalism has become a linguistic battleground – and when reporters use terms such ‘spike in violence’ or ‘surge’ or ‘settler’, they are playing along with a pernicious game, argues Robert Fisk

Let's kick against the Eighties revival

Will the resurgence of the Tories prompt any decent protest music? DJ and journalist Ian McCann certainly hopes so

Army given new rifles to engage enemies from further away

British troops are to be issued with a new infantry combat rifle for the first time in 20 years to cope with the fierce fighting conditions of the Afghan war.

Album: Henry Threadgill, The Complete Remastered...(CamJazz)

The enigmatic Chicago-born reedsman/ composer Threadgill gets a seven-disc box-set devoted to his work for Italy's venerable Black Saint and Soul Note labels.

Kent State marks 40 years since shootings

The relatives of four students killed by National Guard troops at Kent State University remembered their loved ones along with hundreds of people who gathered at the site 40 years later.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?