Arts and Entertainment

A familiar story of Lennon's post-Beatles years – with some fascinating new detail

The Man from Saigon, By Marti Leimbach

From Tim O'Brien and Denis Johnson to Bao Ninh, the war in Vietnam gave rise to long shelf of fine fiction. In this novel, set in Saigon and the jungle battlefields of 1967, Marti Leimbach nods to forerunners but still finds a path of her own through the maze of lies and fear.

Vietnam War chief dies

Former US Defence Secretary Robert McNamara who was vilified for prosecuting the Vietnam War died at home in Washington yesterday aged 93.

Robert McNamara: Secretary of Defense excoriated for his part in leading America into the Vietnam War

In another age and circumstance, Robert McNamara might have been a classic American success story. He was a brilliant student, a formidable administrator who impressed everyone who met him. Destiny, however, propelled him to a job which made him a prime architect of arguably America's greatest foreign policy disaster. The young Robert McNamara had a dazzling career in Detroit; an older and saddened McNamara was President of the World Bank for 13 years. But he will forever be remembered for "McNamara's War," the tragedy of his middle years which was the calamitous US adventure in Vietnam.

Vietnam War defence chief dies aged 93

Robert S. McNamara, the cerebral secretary of defence who was vilified for prosecuting the Vietnam War, then devoted himself to helping the world's poorest nations, died today. He was 93.

Orwell's 1984 sixty years on

The classic was published on 8 June 1949 – and has had a deep impact on millions. Andrew Johnson talks to writers about it – and asks them to cite their favourite reads

Peter Popham: A forgotten war – and now, a discarded armistice

For decades it was as chilling a symbol of the Cold War as the Berlin Wall: the DMZ, Korea's laughably mis-named "demilitarised zone", stretching 155 miles across the peninsula along the 38th parallel, prickly with landmines and tank traps, the buffer zone that kept the huge armies of the North and South apart.

Hubert Van Es: Photographer who took one of the best-known images of the Vietnam War

A handful of shocking black and white photographs seemed to capture the essence of the Vietnam War. Nick Ut's picture of Kim Phuc fleeing her napalmed village, and Eddie Adams's shot of General Nguyen Ngoc Loan summarily executing a Viet Cong prisoner defined the war's brutality. But nothing depicted its ultimate futility and failure better than a shot of a long line of evacuees waiting to climb a rooftop stair to squeeze into the last helicopter leaving Saigon, which was taken by Hubert Van Es.

Pham Van Dong: South Vietnamese general who could not defend Saigon against the Communists

Pham Van Dong was a Major General in the now almost forgotten Army of the Republic of (South) Vietnam (ARVN).

Paul Harvey: Radio broadcaster who became the voice of Middle America

Out in Middle America, everyone knew and loved Paul Harvey. During a long drive, his was the voice that made you stop spinning the dial for a country and western station. His rich staccato baritone delivered the news to millions twice a day, morning and noon, for decades; he was a national institution, an icon of the American way in the American heartland, in America's imagined golden age.

Trauma, By Patrick McGrath

"My mother's first depressive illness occurred when I was seven years old, and I felt that it was my fault." This is the first sentence of Patrick McGrath's psychological thriller, and it sets the tone for what follows: guilt, mental illness and the tensions within families are themes which run throughout the novel.

Diary of a Fresher: 'Sorry, but we don't care as much as your generation did'

Recently, university students across the country have been getting all political over Gaza. It's very nice to think that this is proof that proper student activism didn't die at about the same time Old Labour did, but, sadly, I'm not convinced. As far as I can tell, the general atmosphere here is one of apathy. Yes, we have a thriving student union, societies for each of the main political parties, not to mention the rather brave bunch of people who decided to occupy a certain faculty over the recent Israeli activity in Gaza. But rather than being something fundamental to our lives and identities as students, politics has the feel of just another extra-curricular activity, like wine-tasting or rowing or live-action role-playing. It's all very niche.

The early vision of Philip Jones Griffiths

Before becoming the world's most fêted war photographer, Philip Jones Griffiths trained his lens on Britain's 1960s revolution.

Ignatieff: From prime time to Canadian prime minister?

Presenter who helped send Britons to bed wakes up as the next hope for Canadian Liberals. By Leonard Doyle

Mary Ewert: 'Why I want the world to see my husband die'

As the final moments of a terminally ill man who committed suicide in a Zurich clinic are shown on television, his widow explains the reasons why
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