i

Teachers at free school to strike

Is the Catholic Church in favour of GM crops?

Lab Notes

Vitamin D, the cure-all supplement that could be bad for your health

It is called "bottled sunshine" and claimed to be one of the most effective health supplements on the market. Scores of studies have suggested that it protects against heart disease, cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis, and a growing number of doctors have recommended it to their patients.

Routine use of vitamin E may increase stroke risk

Doctors warned today against the routine use of vitamin E supplements after a study showed they could increase the risk of one kind of stroke.

How to treat a cold without drugs

Medicines won’t heal a winter virus faster – and some will even prolong it. But the best remedies don’t need a trip to the chemist, says Kate Hilpern

World Cup winning Germany team may have been on drugs

West Germany's 1954 World Cup-winning team, feted as the men who helped put a nation back on its feet after World War Two, may have been boosted by a secret doping programme, according to a new university study.

Dressing table: The best make-up for autumn colours

1. Five Colour Eye Shadow Palette

Bad medicine: Why echinacea won’t fix your cold

As the flu season approaches, sales of multivitamins soar. But the popularity of supplements isn't just misguided – it's dangerous, says New Yorker science writer Michael Specter

Do vitamin supplements really work?

Asked by: Carole Cooper, Southampton. Answered by: Dr Jeya Henry, Professor of Human Nutrition and Director of Functional Food Centre, Oxford Brookes University

Daily vitamin pill could reduce dementia's effects by up to 50 per cent

Tests suggest vitamin B supplements can dramatically slow the onset of Alzheimer's and similar diseases

Fiona Phillips: A treatment for this most cruel of diseases would mean so much to so many

If you're diagnosed you are told to get on with it - there's this awful misconception that it's just part of old age

The tin can revolution: The humble invention that changed the way we live

Captain Scott took them to the South Pole. The Royal Navy relied on them and they even played a part in the emancipation of women

Fish makes waves now he's happy on the scales

Chips, cheeseburgers and pizza are kicked into touch as American transforms his career to become a genuine US Open contender

Revealed: how vitamin D can protect us from cancer

Scientists discover how substance controls actions of genes

Letters: the burka

Backing for the burka

Not enough beef? 'Let them eat insects'

With around 70 per cent of the world's agricultural land now being used for meat production, a Dutch insect specialist has suggested a novel way of catering to the world's growing population – by eating insects instead of mammals.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles: How the author foretold the Californian water crisis

Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles

How the author foretold the Californian water crisis
Chinese artist who posted funny image of President Xi Jinping facing five years in prison as authorities crackdown on dissent in the arts

Art attack

Chinese artist who posted funny image of President Xi Jinping facing five years in prison
10 best wedding gift ideas

It's that time of year again... 10 best wedding gift ideas

Forget that fancy toaster, we've gone off-list to find memorable gifts that will last a lifetime
Blundering Tony Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

Blundering Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

For Arabs – and for Britons who lost their loved ones in his shambolic war in Iraq – his appointment was an insult, says Robert Fisk
Fifa corruption arrests: All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue

Fifa corruption arrests

All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue, says Ian Herbert
Isis in Syria: The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of President Assad and militant fighters

The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of Assad and Isis

In Syrian Kurdish cantons along the Turkish border, the progressive aims of the 2011 uprising are being enacted despite the war. Patrick Cockburn returns to Amuda
How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields: Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape the US

How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields

Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape to the US
Stephen Mangan interview: From posh buffoon to pregnant dad, the actor has quite a range

How Stephen Mangan got his range

Posh buffoon, hapless writer, pregnant dad - Mangan is certainly a versatile actor
The ZX Spectrum has been crowd-funded back into play - with some 21st-century tweaks

The ZX Spectrum is back

The ZX Spectrum was the original - and for some players, still the best. David Crookes meets the fans who've kept the games' flames lit
Grace of Monaco film panned: even the screenwriter pours scorn on biopic starring Nicole Kidman

Even the screenwriter pours scorn on Grace of Monaco biopic

The critics had a field day after last year's premiere, but the savaging goes on
Menstrual Hygiene Day: The strange ideas people used to believe about periods

Menstrual Hygiene Day: The strange ideas people once had about periods

If one was missed, vomiting blood was seen as a viable alternative
The best work perks: From free travel cards to making dreams come true (really)

The quirks of work perks

From free travel cards to making dreams come true (really)
Is bridge the latest twee pastime to get hip?

Is bridge becoming hip?

The number of young players has trebled in the past year. Gillian Orr discovers if this old game has new tricks
Long author-lists on research papers are threatening the academic work system

The rise of 'hyperauthorship'

Now that academic papers are written by thousands (yes, thousands) of contributors, it's getting hard to tell workers from shirkers
The rise of Lego Clubs: How toys are helping children struggling with social interaction to build better relationships

The rise of Lego Clubs

How toys are helping children struggling with social interaction to build better relationships