Arts and Entertainment Elton John performing at his 'Brits Icon' concert at The Palladium in London

Sir Elton John has become the recipient of the first Brits Icon award after being presented with honour by Rod Stewart at a special concert at the London Palladium.

Cornelia Parker: The artist's home is an industrial revelation

It was a run-down building, on a street where cars are still torched. But the artist Cornelia Parker spotted an opportunity to create a fabulous home

Ono unveils naked tribute to Lennon

Photographs by Yoko Ono of a woman's breast and crotch are adorning public buildings across Liverpool.

Stars Imagine an end to homelessness

"IMAGINE THERE'S no Heaven, it's easy if you try..."

INTERVIEW: IMAGINE YOKO'S OWN STORY

John Lennon's `Imagine' has been elevated to the status of a secular hymn for the Millennium. On the eve of its third release, Michael Bracewell talks to his widow, Yoko Ono, about the origins of the song and her continuing belief in its message

Arts: Muzak of the Millennium

John Lennon's `Imagine' will soon be unavoidable as the soundtrack to the next century. How did a Marxist utopian dirge become so famous?

You ask the questions: (Such as: Cynthia Lennon, if you could ask Yoko Ono one question about John Lennon, what would it be?

Cynthia Lennon, 59, from Hoylake in the Wirral, is an artist and the first wife of John Lennon. She met John in 1957, when they were students at the Liverpool College of Art. They married in 1962 and had one son, Julian, now a singer. They divorced in 1968, when John left her for Yoko Ono. In 1995, Cynthia enjoyed a fleeting taste of pop stardom, releasing a cover version of "Those Were the Days". She has been a regular on the Beatles convention circuit, but recently announced her intention to retire. Cynthia currently has an exhibition of drawings and paintings at Portobello Road's KDK Gallery. She lives in Normandy.

Lennon museum for Tokyo

Lennon museum for Tokyo
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

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It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
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One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
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Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
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One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
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The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

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More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

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Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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