Where to stay in Denmark: An old smugglers' inn, Scandi-chic hotels and a hip hostel

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The Independent Travel

Urban House, Copenhagen

Hostels don't get hipper than the Urban House, which opened last month. As well as the traditional dorms and bar, it has a live stage, plus a quiet room – in case everything else gets a bit much. The rooms come in eight categories, from Shoebox, for solo travellers, to Five Bed Bunka Bunka, which sleeps 10. The dorms are simple, but design-driven: think wooden floors, metal bunk beds, and walls emblazoned with graffiti. Even the laundry room is cool, with headphones and TV screens to entertain guests while their washing dries. Bikes made from recycled parts are available to rent from the onsite shop; guests can also buy one at the end of their stay and have it shipped home. You can also leave with tattoos, which the hostel offers in its own tattoo parlour.

Colbjørnsensgade 11 (00 45 33 23 29 29; urbanhouse.me). Doubles from Dkr580 (£57), room only.

Skovshoved Hotel, Charlottenlund

Half an hour's drive from the centre of Copenhagen, this stylish boutique hotel is in the sleepy seaside suburb of Charlottenlund. Depite having welcomed guests since the 17th century, the 22 bedrooms are modern and light, with rich wooden floors and breezy decor. Some come with balconies and sea views. There's also a communal area with an honesty bar, and a private jetty five minutes' walk away.

Beach Road 267 (00 45 39 64 00 28; skovshovedhotel.dk). Doubles from Dkr1,225 (£120), room only.

Hotel SP34, Copenhagen

Located in Copenhagen's old Latin Quarter, with trendy restaurants, vintage shops and cool bars within walking distance, this 118-room hotel matches its its bohemian surroundings. The rooms are modern, with great views through the large windows, and quirky decorative touches, such as headboards fashioned from chair backs. The hotel has two restaurants, offering tapas and traditional American food with a Scandinavian twist.

Sankt Peders Stræde 34 (00 45 33 13 30 00; bit.ly/SP34Hotel). Doubles from Dkr2,395 (£235), including breakfast.

Maison Du Nord, Bornholm

This charming house is situated in the north of Bornholm, the wayward Danish island south of Sweden. It consists of three apartments, which can either be booked out separately or together. Both the Printshop on the ground floor and the Gornitzka on the first floor can accommodate eight people, while the Topfloor can sleep four. Each apartment is decorated in traditional Scandi style, simple and chic. The courtyard is kitted out with tables and soft seating for warm nights.

Storegade 4, Allinge (00 45 20 95 12 53; maisondunord.dk). Minimun three day stay from Dkr2,500 (£245), self-catered.

Falsled Kro, Faborg

Located just outside of Faborg, on the island of Funen, this unassuming thatched cottage was once a smugglers' inn, but is now an award-winning restaurant with 22 bedrooms. In keeping with the 16th-century cottage, some rooms have whitewashed walls, beamed ceilings and a traditional decor, while suites come with open fireplaces, private terraces and separate living areas. The restaurant serves up tempting dishes made from local produce, including home-smoked salmon.

Assensvej 513, Millinge (00 45 62 68 11 11; falsledkro.dk). Doubles from Dkr2,100 (£206), room only.

Sommerhus, Skagen

Escape to the country in a beautifully designed holiday home near Denmark's northernmost point. The bright and airy cabin, which sleeps six, has high ceilings and simple interiors, but the key features are the huge windows and sliding doors in the open-plan living area, opening on to terraces with views of the surrounding wilderness. The house also comes with its own sauna, a wood-burning stove and an outdoor fireplace, as well as more modern conveniences such as wi-fi and AppleTV.

Skagen (bitly.com/Sommerhus). One week's self-catered stay from Dkr7,540 (£740).

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