Life and Style The Chefjet produces multicoloured confectionery with 3D technology

We might not be ready to 3D print a roast, but the complicated and edible structures produced by 3D printers could be the start of something new

First Night: Up, Cannes Film Festival

It's not eye-popping, but Pixar gives thrills an extra dimension

Cannes has first sight of cinema’s future

Hollywood hails 3D as the third 'revolution' in cinema

3D: It's coming home

Stand by for a revolution in home entertainment. The next generation of video games will take your breath away and blow your mind. Toby Green reports

Technology brings a new dimension to the Glastonbury experience

Clubbers to don coloured glasses as festival organisers launch '3D disco'

Big screen blasts from the past

The new 3D animation film Monsters vs Aliens takes its characters from Fifties sci-fi B-movies – and makes them cuddly. Expect more of these retro-cultural mash-ups in a cinema near you, says Kaleem Aftab

Monsters vs Aliens (PG)

Monsters vs Aliens is such a barnstorming title that it's a pity that DreamWorks' slick but empty new cartoon does no more than the bare minimum with it. A 50ft woman (voiced by Reese Witherspoon) is recruited by the US government to repel an alien invasion, alongside a few other 1950s B-movie monsters. It has all the overcomplicated, video-game-friendly action sequences we've come to expect from computer animations, as well as all the ironic one-liners and pop-culture references. But it doesn't have much else except the much-vaunted 3D effects, which are diverting at first, but which you get used to after the opening two minutes. A fun time-passer for the Easter holiday, but destined to be forgotten by the time school starts.

Culture: Hold on to the edge of your seat...

In the summer of 1998, a film was released called Deep Impact which boasted the tagline: "Oceans rise. Cities fall. Hope survives." After sitting through its two-hour running time, I decided a more appropriate tagline would be: "Summers come. Movies suck. Hope survives." It is one of the strange paradoxes of the blockbuster season that, no matter how disappointed we are, we always look forward to the following summer with giddy enthusiasm. Some day, we think, Hollywood will get it right.

Bolt - and the other characters who transformed cinema

He's only a dog with a big heart, but experts say he and his friends have the power to resurrect a dead art form - the 3D movie

Leading article: Flat earthers

We might be looking at things differently in the years to come; at least when sitting on the couch. Yesterday Sky unveiled its new 3D television technology. And impressive it sounds too. The special glasses that viewers need to wear might not exactly be the height of fashion, but, by all accounts, the visual effect is quite stimulating.

3D films: the next film revolution?

They've been the next big thing for the past 50 years, but 3D films have finally come of age. Just the thing to get bums on seats, says Chris Evans

Film: Also Showing

Pride and Glory (124 mins, 15)

This gloomy cop thriller stars Edward Norton as an NYPD detective investigating the murder of four police officers by a drug dealer. He quickly uncovers a trail of corruption in the ranks which may lead as far as his brother, Noah Emmerich, their father, Jon Voight, and their brother-in-law, Colin Farrell.

Zeta-Jones to play Cleopatra in 3D musical

The 'Chicago' star has been lined up to play Egyptian queen Cleopatra in $30m film by Steven Soderbergh

Goggles return as TV and film go 3D

Once 3D entertainment meant fumbling aroundwith a pair of multi-coloured spectacles that made you dizzy, before settling down in the cinema to watch a plotless film that involved a giant plastic shark coming out of the screen to get you.

Now that's reality TV: Samsung takes us into the next dimension

The Korean giant is going back to the future to create 3D vision that will propel golf balls from your screen. By Paul Rodgers in Suwon

Gaming: Console yourself

If you’ve played video games all your life, why not turn it into a career by creating them?

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In this photo illustration a school student eats a hamburger as part of his lunch which was brought from a fast food shop near his school, on October 5, 2005 in London, England. The British government has announced plans to remove junk food from school lunches. From September 2006, food that is high in fat, sugar or salt will be banned from meals and removed from vending machines in schools across England. The move comes in response to a campaign by celebrity TV chef Jamie Oliver to improve school meals.
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