Arts and Entertainment

Mr Memory, who was brought on Monday’s Newsnight to memorise the title sequence and couldn’t even remember that Jeremy bloke with the beard’s name. Gosh I love telly. 

Nominations announced for Brit Insurance Designs of the Year

The Brit Insurance Designs of the Year exhibition, which runs from 12 February - 14 June has announced this year's nominations.

Trust the Man (15) <!-- none onestar twostar threestar fourstar fivestar -->

A whole different kind of terrible, Bart Freundlich's romantic comedy seems to distil the very essence of unfunniness. It focuses on two New York couples undergoing some heavy weather in their relationships. Julianne Moore is a stage actress married to David Duchovny, an ex-adman-turned-house husband whose need for sex leads him into an affair, while aspiring writer Maggie Gyllenhaal dreams of a big family but can't get layabout boyfriend Billy Crudup to commit.

Ahead of their time: The young ones

As Theo Walcott becomes the youngest footballer to play for England. Arifa Akbar looks at the other prodigies who have achieved the same feat in their chosen fields

Movers and shakers in a bingo win-win situation

MEETINGS - don't you just hate them? Well, a new pursuit rapidly gaining favour among the downtrodden executives of Britain's leading companies is brightening up even the most boring presentation.

Purge the BBC of its obsession with youth and ratings

I KNOW how Greg Dyke is going to be feeling this morning when he gets out of the chauffeur driven car at Broadcasting House and goes up to his office. It will be rather like I did that January morning back in 1988 when I negotiated my way past security and waited expectantly in the lobby of Television Centre to be told where my office was located.

Digital BBC seen as threat by other TV broadcasters

THE BBC'S digital services are costing commercial broadcasters hundreds of thousands of pounds, according to industry sources. Heated debate on the issue arose as the corporation outlined its digital expansion at the biennial Royal Television Society meeting of senior broadcasters in Cambridge this week.

The unbearable bookshop of laughter and forgetting

`Would it be fair to say that you do not have total respect for the British reading public?'

Right of Reply: Paul Pascoe

The chief executive of the Unique Group, Noel Edmonds's company, responds to Deborah Orr's article about Mr Edmonds leaving the BBC

Stan Hay's Column: A week long on dry wit and the raindrop shot

IT DIDN'T need the reappearance on court of J P McEnroe to remind us that Wimbledon is often about a certain four-letter word - rain. All week, the BBC broadcasts more often than not sported a little yellow ball in the top right-hand corner of the screen with the letter "R" on it. Technically this is meant to signify "replay" or "repeat" to the viewer, but what it has really come to signal is "Rain".

Tennis: Wimbledon 99 - Agassi solves Arthurs puzzle

Former champion progresses as he ends Australian's run of 111 winning service games

Leading article: The BBC governors have chosen the best man for the job

ONE OF the most potent brands in the world came under new management when Greg Dyke was appointed director-general of the BBC. To become editor- in-chief of one of our few internationally recognised and respected institutions, the Coca-Cola of its field, is, of course, a signal honour, and one that Mr Dyke deserves warm congratulations on achieving. Mr Dyke's remarks on getting the job suggest that he well understands what he is taking on and what underpins the BBC's strength as a globally recognised icon of integrity: "It has a reputation for honesty, fairness and, most of all, independence. I am determined to safeguard and protect that."

New Director-General: Bureaucrats threatened under the new regime

THE RUMOUR mill at the BBC is already grinding at full speed over who will do well under Greg Dyke, and what the corporation will be like under the new man.

B is for back-stabbing; B is for bungling; C is for conspiracy; D is for dithering; G is for good grief! Why on earth can't the BBC find a new Director General?

When Hugh Carleton Greene was interviewed by the BBC governors for the job of director general in 1960 it is claimed he was asked one question: "Is it true you're a Catholic?" When Carleton Greene answered in the negative, he was told: "Fine, you've got the job."

MPs to investigate choice of BBC chief

THE BBC is facing a wide-ranging investigation by Parliament over the the selection of its next director-general.

Media: Wanted - a director general who can lead the BBC out of the imperial past

While the governors of the BBC decide who should be the next director general of the corporation, the interminable games of power are played out. Leaks, deals, whispering campaigns and other trivia have taken up much of the attention. We know that Alan Yentob once wore shoes (or was it socks?) that didn't match, that Tony Hall wears unexciting spectacles and that Greg Dyke has many friends in high places and many enemies too. We have also been subjected to the predictable rows over digital broadcasting, dumbing down and whether the BBC can bring Dennis Potter back to earth.
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The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss