Arts and Entertainment

Mr Memory, who was brought on Monday’s Newsnight to memorise the title sequence and couldn’t even remember that Jeremy bloke with the beard’s name. Gosh I love telly. 

Nominations announced for Brit Insurance Designs of the Year

The Brit Insurance Designs of the Year exhibition, which runs from 12 February - 14 June has announced this year's nominations.

Trust the Man (15) <!-- none onestar twostar threestar fourstar fivestar -->

A whole different kind of terrible, Bart Freundlich's romantic comedy seems to distil the very essence of unfunniness. It focuses on two New York couples undergoing some heavy weather in their relationships. Julianne Moore is a stage actress married to David Duchovny, an ex-adman-turned-house husband whose need for sex leads him into an affair, while aspiring writer Maggie Gyllenhaal dreams of a big family but can't get layabout boyfriend Billy Crudup to commit.

Ahead of their time: The young ones

As Theo Walcott becomes the youngest footballer to play for England. Arifa Akbar looks at the other prodigies who have achieved the same feat in their chosen fields

Movers and shakers in a bingo win-win situation

MEETINGS - don't you just hate them? Well, a new pursuit rapidly gaining favour among the downtrodden executives of Britain's leading companies is brightening up even the most boring presentation.

Purge the BBC of its obsession with youth and ratings

I KNOW how Greg Dyke is going to be feeling this morning when he gets out of the chauffeur driven car at Broadcasting House and goes up to his office. It will be rather like I did that January morning back in 1988 when I negotiated my way past security and waited expectantly in the lobby of Television Centre to be told where my office was located.

Digital BBC seen as threat by other TV broadcasters

THE BBC'S digital services are costing commercial broadcasters hundreds of thousands of pounds, according to industry sources. Heated debate on the issue arose as the corporation outlined its digital expansion at the biennial Royal Television Society meeting of senior broadcasters in Cambridge this week.

The unbearable bookshop of laughter and forgetting

`Would it be fair to say that you do not have total respect for the British reading public?'

Right of Reply: Paul Pascoe

The chief executive of the Unique Group, Noel Edmonds's company, responds to Deborah Orr's article about Mr Edmonds leaving the BBC

Stan Hay's Column: A week long on dry wit and the raindrop shot

IT DIDN'T need the reappearance on court of J P McEnroe to remind us that Wimbledon is often about a certain four-letter word - rain. All week, the BBC broadcasts more often than not sported a little yellow ball in the top right-hand corner of the screen with the letter "R" on it. Technically this is meant to signify "replay" or "repeat" to the viewer, but what it has really come to signal is "Rain".

Tennis: Wimbledon 99 - Agassi solves Arthurs puzzle

Former champion progresses as he ends Australian's run of 111 winning service games

Leading article: The BBC governors have chosen the best man for the job

ONE OF the most potent brands in the world came under new management when Greg Dyke was appointed director-general of the BBC. To become editor- in-chief of one of our few internationally recognised and respected institutions, the Coca-Cola of its field, is, of course, a signal honour, and one that Mr Dyke deserves warm congratulations on achieving. Mr Dyke's remarks on getting the job suggest that he well understands what he is taking on and what underpins the BBC's strength as a globally recognised icon of integrity: "It has a reputation for honesty, fairness and, most of all, independence. I am determined to safeguard and protect that."

New Director-General: Bureaucrats threatened under the new regime

THE RUMOUR mill at the BBC is already grinding at full speed over who will do well under Greg Dyke, and what the corporation will be like under the new man.

B is for back-stabbing; B is for bungling; C is for conspiracy; D is for dithering; G is for good grief! Why on earth can't the BBC find a new Director General?

When Hugh Carleton Greene was interviewed by the BBC governors for the job of director general in 1960 it is claimed he was asked one question: "Is it true you're a Catholic?" When Carleton Greene answered in the negative, he was told: "Fine, you've got the job."

MPs to investigate choice of BBC chief

THE BBC is facing a wide-ranging investigation by Parliament over the the selection of its next director-general.

Media: Wanted - a director general who can lead the BBC out of the imperial past

While the governors of the BBC decide who should be the next director general of the corporation, the interminable games of power are played out. Leaks, deals, whispering campaigns and other trivia have taken up much of the attention. We know that Alan Yentob once wore shoes (or was it socks?) that didn't match, that Tony Hall wears unexciting spectacles and that Greg Dyke has many friends in high places and many enemies too. We have also been subjected to the predictable rows over digital broadcasting, dumbing down and whether the BBC can bring Dennis Potter back to earth.
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003