Arts and Entertainment

Monks from China’s Shaolin Temple stand perched on tall wooden boxes. Swaying from side to side, they rock the crates until they fall, leaping free at the last moment. Famous for their warrior skills, in Sutra the monks are both movers and pieces in a puzzle, setting up patterns or standing inside the boxes as they fall like dominoes.

Leading article: Sweet sculpture

Contemporary art is often characterised as intensely international. So it is perhaps remarkable how many of the proposals for a work of art to grace the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square seem to have made reference to the British national spirit.

Antony Gormley's world tour continues: this stop, the Alps

hHgh on a hill was a lonely Gormley, layee odl, layee odl, lay-ee-o... As Maria might have trilled had she spotted the solitary, watchful figure, his feet planted firmly in grass and edelweiss, his gaze directed balefully out over the snowy peaks of the Alps. In fact, this Gormley is far from lonely. He's one of 100 identical figures, cropping up across the mountains of Vorarlberg in west Austria, like so many cast-iron von Trapps.

Antony Gormley: The site is a real challenge to artists

To use an archaic device of elevation (both of value and physical height) for the display of contemporary sculpture in the context of a collectively occupied and politically charged square at the centre of London is a wonderfully risky business, but one well worth the biscuit.

Antony Gormley, White Cube, Mason's Yard, London

Antony Gormley has come to embody what we might think of as a "public" artist. You might think about popularity, or the populace when you think of his work: commuters zipping past the Angel of the North on the A1, or last year's One and the Other, his project for the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square that saw members of the public standing on the plinth. He is popular, and perhaps feels that his popularity is looked down on by the art world. Is he really an artist of the people, then? Perhaps not.

Gormley reveals labyrinthine artwork

A huge glowing labyrinth of grids filling a blackened room was unveiled today as Angel of the North creator Antony Gormley's latest artwork.

Babel (words), Sadler's Wells, London

Flemish-Moroccan choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui is known for his collaborations. He's recently worked with Akram Khan, with Shaolin Temple monks, with the sculptor Antony Gormley. Gormley is back for Babel (words): Cherkaoui's multi-cultural cast argue in a mix of languages, framed by steel Gormley shapes that suggest towers or cages.

Antony Gormley's Critical Mass revisited

Antony Gormley's 1995 installation 'Critical Mass' is now on display on the roof of the De La Warr Pavilion.

Observations: Antony Gormley's New York's statues set to be a towering success

With so much to occupy the senses at ground level in New York City, it's all too easy not to look up. But cast your eyes above the crowded pavements and mirrored office windows surrounding Madison Square Park and you soon begin to spot them.

Website archive 'will cover just 1% of total'

An archive of UK websites will cover just 1 per cent of the total by next year unless the new rules are introduced, chief executive of the British Library Dame Lynne Brindley warned today.

The good, the bad and the naked of London's Plinth

From the man in the skin-tight yellow Morph suit to the existential humanitarian who did absolutely nothing, 2,400 people have now climbed the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square to take part in Antony Gormley's artwork.

Death row gran in fourth plinth 'appearance'

A British grandmother on death row in the US is today sending out a message via Trafalgar Square's Fourth Plinth today.

Chimp's memoir in running for Booker Prize

The longlist for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction was announced today, including two former winners and three first time novelists in what was described by judges as an "exceptional" year.

Tom Sutcliffe: Honesty is in large part a social virtue

I don't have very high hopes for the Honesty Lab, an online research project set up by a group of academics in order to assist judges to gauge shifting public attitudes as to what counts as culpable (or punishable) dishonesty. The problem is apparently this – that some juries feel the black and white intransigence of the law isn't a good match for the murky shades of grey one encounters in life, and have a tendency to acquit in cases where they have a sneaky sympathy with what the perpetrator has done. I thought the whole point about juries was their perversity – that an assembly of one's peers would temper the inflexible severity of the law with a consensual understanding of morality. But apparently there's some anxiety that it's all been getting out of hand recently, so the Honesty Lab website sets out to take an audit of public attitudes to varying forms of dishonesty so that judges will be able to aim off in giving their directions.

The weird and wonderful world of the plinth at night

Putting yourself on the pedestal in daylight is one thing – but the real heroes of Trafalgar Square come out at night.
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