Arts and Entertainment Andrew Marr edited 'The Independent' between 1996 and 1998

Broadcaster and journalist Andrew Marr, 53, has left hospital two months after suffering a stroke.

Aural anarchy from the sound of silence

Deaf poet and musician Aaron Williamson gives explosive `recitals'. Susan de Muth was among the shell-shocked

The Law on the street

In Bath, says Paul Kingsnorth (right) police are accused of `purging' the homeless from the city centre.

Train set who really are not so awful

How the 8.17 disproved minister

Video's not always rock'n'roll suicide

Most pop videos used to represent the nadir of pop music: there seemed to be no middle ground between triviality and pomposity. It took film directors sticking an oar in to really stir things up. Jonathan Demme made a simple film to accompany New Order's"Perfect Kiss". (He'd already revitalised the concert film with the Talking Heads' Stop Making Sense.) Derek Jarman assembled The Queen Is Dead, which brought a collage of images to three songs by the Smiths (with Morrissey, left). Wim Wenders a nd Spike Lee were quick to follow, and Martin Scorsese was handed the prestigious task of providing a promo for Michael Jackson's "Bad".

London medical schools in £60m hi-tech merger

Plan to unify four historic teaching hospitals in `multi-faculty' scien ce centre angers students

High blood pressure: is your doctor on the case?

Hypertension may cause no symptoms, but if it goes undiagnosed, you could be in for trouble. Barbara Rowlands reports

Metro Choice: Check out Echobelly

Echobelly may be the most politically correct pop band in Britain, sporting a female Asian singer and black lesbian guitarist, but this doesn't stop them wigging out in a gorgeously tuneful post-grunge fashion. Although singer Sonya Aurora-Madan obviously owns a well-thumbed copy of The Complete Sing-A-Long-A-Morrissey, her lyrics, about patriarchy and arranged marriages, give a very Nineties spin to the thundering band, and Smiths-style moping doesn't get a look in. This year's debut album, Everyone's Got One, is finer even than Blur's Parklife and proves what kids knew: that the British music scene is a vibrant, live thing. Fight hard for tickets for Tuesday's one-off gig at the Astoria, Charing Cross Road (071-434 0403): if their modern masterpiece 'Insomniac' doesn't thrill you to your boots, then you must be dead.

Rugby League: Edwards left on tenterhooks

Shaun Edwards, Great Britain's captain, learns today whether his involvement in the Test series against Australia is suspended or even ended completely.

Pop: Shed Seven

No one would ever mistake Yorkshire's roguishly disarming youth popsters, Shed Seven, for Yankophiles. With short hair, Fred Perry shirts and a bravado whiff of ridiculous self assurance that's straight out of Blur's 1992 patent, it's little surprise labels like 'mod-punk' and - horrors - 'New Wave Of New Wave' have dogged the group this year. Thankfully, there's more to the fact that they've scored two hit singles and a Top-20 album in Change Giver (Polydor).

After Hours

Being famous means that one has to avoid places where ordinary people congregate. It's hard to sit down in a restaurant without someone wanting to take your order or show you some wine list or other.

Letter: Epidemic disease under control

Sir: In your article about the present outbreak of cases of plague in India and other epidemic diseases ('Bugs from the past that pose threat to the future', 1 October), Liz Hunt claims that 'leprosy will cripple six million people this year'. The total estimated number of leprosy patients (not new patients in a year) in the world is about six million and less than half of these are crippled.

Where shall we meet?: Aroma Express Bar

Americans use bookshops as pick-up joints. Your average Briton uses them to meet their mother where they know she'll be safe. Foyle's is a rabbit warren which, once entered, holds out little hope of egress let alone

The low road to pulped fiction: Chris Mullin explains why the rise of junk publishing left him flogging his own book

THE DECISION last week by Hodder Headline to withdraw from the Net Book Agreement is the latest step in the remorseless corporate takeover of British publishing. It is certain to provoke a book price war which, like other price wars, will end with the triumph of the gigantic over the merely huge (the small will not get a look in). This may not be good news for the reading public but it certainly is for junk publishers.

'Penis' missing

Police have been called in to find an ashtray shaped like a penis, which was once used as a murder weapon. Medical students were blamed when the ashtray, a skeleton and two foetuses in a jar disappeared in August from the pathology museum at Charing Cross hospital.

Health: The mole that masquerades as pregnancy: Women are rarely warned of one distressing condition that can follow a miscarriage. Margaret Park reports

When Jean McLaurin had a miscarriage she was prepared for some discomfort and bleeding in the days after the routine operation to remove the products of conception. A week later, however, the bleeding was so heavy that Mrs McLaurin, 36, thought something must be wrong. Her doctor diagnosed a post-operative infection and prescribed antibiotics.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence