Arts and Entertainment Andrew Marr edited 'The Independent' between 1996 and 1998

Broadcaster and journalist Andrew Marr, 53, has left hospital two months after suffering a stroke.

THE SUZI FEAY COLUMN : watch out, there's a nutter about

ONE evening as I was bowling along to Charing Cross to catch a train, I stopped by the doors of the National Portrait Gallery to help a man who looked hopelessly lost. Normally I'd swerve by just like anyone else, but a sideways glance confirmed that this one at least didn't look like a lunatic. Middle-aged, a luxuriant head of gilded hair, clothes smart-casual, air of amused bewilderment. "Excuse me?" he smiled. Probably just wanted to know the way to the Ambassadors' Theatre. "Yes, can I help?" I responded. "Well, I hope so," he sighed expansively, speaking very slowly. Almost immediately I realised my mistake.

Row over doctor shuts specialist children's clinic

Britain's only clinic for children with neurological and genetic disorders due to a special vitamin deficiency has closed after a row over its staff and standards.

Tar explosions cause IRA panic

A series of explosions which renewed fears of an IRA campaign in central London yesterday turned out to be gas cylinders ignited by a fire in a tar boiler. The blasts rocked the Strand near Trafalgar Square sending a sheet of flame 20ft into the air above a building under renovation.

It took 80 years to act

Governments have ignored the dangers for most of this century, writes Geoffrey Lean

`Spy' tells of animal cruelty

LOUISE JURY

Palace arrest

A doctor who has followed the Princess of Wales on many engagements has been arrested for a second time. Klaus Wagner, 37, from Germany, was handing leaflets to tourists outside Buckingham Palace on Saturday when he was held on suspicion of a breach of the peace.

Don't look now

Peeping Tom revolted critics in 1960. Now it is a classic. But then the man who wrote it is not quite as he seems.

Bombers hit London's West End

2.30am news:; IRA man may be among three feared dead as peace hopes blasted again

West End bomb causes chaos

JOJO MOYES and

Electric device to trumpet a silent age

Tony Fisher (with trumpet) expects never to be asked to pipe down again, writes Charles Arthur. Pictured in St Martin-in-the-Fields church in Charing Cross, London, the leader of the Bert Kampfaert orchestra yesterday demonstrated an electronic trumpet mute that makes the instrument inaudible to those nearby - such as John and Diana Wyatt, in front - while amplifying it to normal levels in the player's headphones.

Britain has high hopes for Olympics

Rowing

Stones roll back years in Brixton

It was the hottest ticket of the summer. It was luminous yellow plastic, worn round the wrist hospital-style, and it got you into London's Brixton Academy last night to see the last date of the Rolling Stones' UK Tour.

THE PLAY / OLD TIMES

The first London production in 10 years of Pinter's greatest play, a riveting study of a triangular relationship. Julie Christie's London debut understandably stole the pre-publicity headlines, but Lindy Davies's revival also marks the long overdue West End debut of Harriet Walter, a National Theatre, RSC and Royal Court star for years.

The right main for the job

It comes sanctified by France's leading linguistic theorists, but your mother won't like it. Exactly 26 years after it was written, the novel Eden Eden Eden is finally crossing the Channel together with its accursed progenitor, Pierre Guyotat. It's been a long, hard wait. The book was banned for 11 years by the French Ministry of the Interior as pornographic, its author denounced and praised in equal measure as the new Marquis de Sade/Jean Genet/Antonin Artaud (tick as appropriate). But it's not so much what Guyotat writes about (perpetual, feral sexual acts in the Algerian desert during a period of civil war) as the way he writes, that has attracted outrage. Always a terrible enfant, he masturbates as he pens, coating his manuscripts in a cocktail of ink, semen, dirt and blood. Calling him another pretentious French wanker will get you nowhere, because he sweeps the critical carpet from underneath your feet. His prostitution is his art, his book is intended to stink. More importantly, as Roland Barthes, oozing praise, points out: "Criticism, unable to discuss the author, his subject, or his style, can find no way of taking hold of this text" - it's not "the adventure of some hero, but the adventure of the signifier itself". Don't just take his word for it, though. The manuscripts are going on display and the man himself will no doubt be only too happy to give you a taste of his work.

A chilling bedside manner

The residency of an artist at a teaching hospital, with access to a gruesome medical archive, has resulted in remarkable and disturbing work. By Marina Warner
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee